What is kVA?


#1

The generators are powered by "kVA" unit. What does it mean?


#2

That stands for (kilo) Volt-Ampere, where kilo means 10^3 (i.e. 1000). Finally some use of all the physics! XD

It's basically the apparent power in an AC circuit, which I think is almost equal to the actual power.


#3

Since I know this relates to your (newly purchased) generator, I think this might help:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outdoor/generator/sizing.aspx

KVa = kW*Power Factor

Larger generators tend to have a power factor of less than 1, whereas smaller generators (more efficient?) have a power factor of 1, i.e. KVa translates in to kW seamlessly. In your case, your generator produces a total of ~2500 Watts which you can use which ever way you want. That being said, it is best to at _least_ use 40% of the power your generator makes and at most 80%. Within this range, things are gravy, apparently below and above you run in to problems (according to my generator guy, who is very reputable).

I could be wrong, but thats my understanding. Will correct / add if I find anything contrary to this.

@isharis

Come online on MSN already =)

edit: fixed mistakes based on more research


#4

this is amount of power in AC circuitry and basic unit is VA derived from Power = Voltage * Current


#5

Wzub is correct, its the apparent power in AC.


#6

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Since I know this relates to your (newly purchased) generator, I think this might help:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outdoor/generator/sizing.aspx

KVa = kW*Power Factor

Larger generators tend to have a power factor of less than 1, whereas smaller generators (more efficient?) have a power factor of 1, i.e. KVa translates in to kW seamlessly. In your case, your generator produces a total of ~2500 Watts which you can use which ever way you want. That being said, it is best to at least use 40% of the power your generator makes and at most 80%. Within this range, things are gravy, apparently below and above you run in to problems (according to my generator guy, who is very reputable).

I could be wrong, but thats my understanding. Will correct / add if I find anything contrary to this.

@isharis

Come online on MSN already =)

edit: fixed mistakes based on more research

[/quote]

Thanks, Raza. 40% of the rated output of the power? Hmm, I use less than 40% of the power generated. My family has a different concept. Less usage = less petrol consumption. I guess, that’s wrong.

P.S: When do you want me on MSN? I am trying to get this project off my hands so we can focus on RDMY.


#7

There is a baseline efficiency as far as the generator goes, i.e. the minimum it will produce is 40%-50% of the capacity, it cannot consume less than that amount, so any consumption levels below that mark is simple inefficient in the sense it gets wasted.

re: RDMY, whenever, no worries finish of your current project


#8

Generator efficiency depends on its size and loading. By efficiency, its ability to convert the engine rotational power into electricity is meant...not fuel consumption.

Large size generators (5KVA or higher) are said to be most efficient when loaded between 70%-80% of their capacity. Fuel consumption remains more or less the same till this limit...any higher loading means more fuel consumption, more wear & tear etc.