Ufone launches BlackBerry service


#1

ISLAMABAD (April 26 2008): Ufone, one of the leading telecommunication operators in Pakistan, has launched BlackBerry service for its valued corporate customers on the go, says a press release. Ovex Technologies, the largest third party offshore Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) and IT solution provider in Pakistan, has been chosen by Ufone to partner the provisioning of this BlackBerry service, the release said.

Ovex Technologies and Ufone's flawless network coverage in over 3,000 cities, towns and villages across Pakistan and over 75 destinations world-wide, now offers Ufone's corporate customers the accessibility to reach business and office while on the move.

CEO Ufone, Abdul Aziz, said, "we are proud to achieve yet another milestone, on this road to success, that provides service excellence to our valued customers. We are pleased to partner with another big name in the industry that will help us continue our efforts and commitment to keep our customers, our foremost priority, satisfied." Ufone is an Etisalat Group Company with the second largest cellular operator base in Pakistan with more than 16 million customers.

Ufone services are spread across all the major cities, towns, villages and tehsil head quarters in Pakistan. The company employs more than 2,200 people and operates with a network of more than 350 franchises and 25 company-owned customer service centres along with a distribution network of 150,000 outlets nation-wide. Ufone is committed to providing its valued customers a communication experience they never forget. Because for us...it's all about U.-PR

Source: http://www.brecorder.com/index.php?id=728036&currPageNo=1&query=&search=&term=&supDate=


#2

Is anybody here interested in using Blackberrys (other than for business use)?


#3

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Ovex Technologies and Ufone’s flawless network coverage in over 3,000 cities, towns and villages across Pakistan and over 75 destinations world-wide, now offers Ufone’s corporate customers the accessibility to reach business and office while on the move.
[/quote]

The bold parts highlight a flaw. The Ufone network is not flawless.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
Is anybody here interested in using Blackberrys (other than for business use)?
[/quote]

No. I don’t see why I would need it when I can check my email easily on my current N73ME.


#4

I am not.


#5

what is so special about these black berry devices. If its only for push email, can't we get that on normal cell phones?


#6

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

what is so special about these black berry devices. If its only for push email, can’t we get that on normal cell phones?
[/quote]

With a Nokia smartphone (any symbian one) you can set it to check mail every X minutes, and configure it for a Pop or IMAP server. I prefer using the Gmail app though, it works very well over slow GPRS connections.

Push email is actually a big negative for me, I don’t know why anyone would want to read email in real time - big distraction. Of course, for certain jobs you need push email, but push email is so annoying that in the future people will get hazard pay to use it…


#7

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

what is so special about these black berry devices. If its only for push email, can’t we get that on normal cell phones?
[/quote]

Erm - you can use Push Email on the Sonyericsson k790i. I haven’t used it (since you need an exchange-server for push email to work)


#8

#9

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

1. ufone is the best available network in pakistan i guess…
[/quote]

Sure. If Ufone is crap, Mobilink, Telenor, Warid and Zong are crappier. Relatively, Ufone is the best but it is still crap.


#10

they should improve their current services before getting into more sh1t with newer services.

BTW when the hell will PTA allow these guys to start 3G services... i guess, like the usual ...when european operators will start providing 6G, in pakistan, 3G will be introduced then.

P.S. flawless network? FTW


#11

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

what is so special about these black berry devices. If its only for push email, can’t we get that on normal cell phones?
[/quote]

its an addiction - and its an international fever - its the tool of the corporate sector. BUT its worth it - i know many other cell phones can get PUSH emails but BB has encryption technologies etc… and lot other things - even Govt. of PK cannot read my emails … all traffic is carried by dedicated circutis to UK/US and then it goes out from there…

but before i was on BB, i thought like same you are now - try it; it will change your thoughts. Life is so gray without it :)


#12

Man if your life gets so gray without your emails popping up in your phone in real-time then you have a real problem :-)


#13

yup i'm single :) there lies the answer


#14

@binaryzero

I would not be so confident regarding your "encryption" security with blackberry. RIM has to answer to both Canadian and US governments; both governments have access to information that flows over that network. Furthermore, RIM has conceded that they will have to modify their network model to reflect the increasing need for oversight; India is a prime example, where the government has told them to either open up the network for their perusal, or get out of the country in 30 days. Not as secure as you think.

The best way to secure your emails remains PGP encryption and one-time authorization keys. There is no substitute.

That being said, the push email feature of Blackberry is outstanding, and nothing comes close to the "right now-ness" of their service. There is of course, always a downside, to being accessible at all times. If Blackberry sorted out its devices, in terms of keyboard, media functionality and even desktop software, I would be willing to give them a second look. Having used their devices, on a very robust network, I am not sure they have it what it takes to produce a great consumer device.

Lastly, I just want to touch upon the fact that Blackberry users tend to be a little obnoxious, self-involved and arrogant. The idea or delusion that you "need" to be available, connected and "in-demand" 24/7 usually contributes to that mind state. Frankly, unless you are dealing with matters of national security, foreign affairs, intelligence or high-stakes-PR, there is little reason, in Pakistan at least, that you need "PUSH" email. I speak from experience =)


#15

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

@binaryzero

I would not be so confident regarding your “encryption” security with blackberry. RIM has to answer to both Canadian and US governments; both governments have access to information that flows over that network. Furthermore, RIM has conceded that they will have to modify their network model to reflect the increasing need for oversight; India is a prime example, where the government has told them to either open up the network for their perusal, or get out of the country in 30 days. Not as secure as you think.

The best way to secure your emails remains PGP encryption and one-time authorization keys. There is no substitute.

That being said, the push email feature of Blackberry is outstanding, and nothing comes close to the “right now-ness” of their service. There is of course, always a downside, to being accessible at all times. If Blackberry sorted out its devices, in terms of keyboard, media functionality and even desktop software, I would be willing to give them a second look. Having used their devices, on a very robust network, I am not sure they have it what it takes to produce a great consumer device.

Lastly, I just want to touch upon the fact that Blackberry users tend to be a little obnoxious, self-involved and arrogant. The idea or delusion that you “need” to be available, connected and “in-demand” 24/7 usually contributes to that mind state. Frankly, unless you are dealing with matters of national security, foreign affairs, intelligence or high-stakes-PR, there is little reason, in Pakistan at least, that you need “PUSH” email. I speak from experience =)

[/quote]

I agree with most of what you said but not to this point that in Pakistan we dont need it :) I can assure you there are many companies for whome BB like services are the must - a no resopnse of email can cost you some thousands to hundred thousands of $$$. In my case, yup thats correct too - being a manager of Global Network Operations, i have to manage a diverse teams sitting in Philippines, Lahore, Karachi, USA, UK - so you cannot live without such device -

btw i’m satisified customer of BB - i like its keyboard and as now they are already bringing Multimedia based BB’s thats an edge - and a new phone known as IK (IPhone-killer) is going to be launched very soon which should give RIM a boom.

btw , i trust US/UK Govt. more than PK govt. - atleast they have to take a internal warrant before accessing your email and if i’m not wrong i have no worries of my emails being read by security agencies but in PK - i’m sorry, we dont have Justice - no mechanism to control agencies. for India RIM yet have to deliver that solution, in PK i can assure you , its not deployed.

regarding PGP, what do you think its not breakable ? :) talk about NSA - its very illegal to use the encryption which is undecryptable - so if US Govt. have allowed PGP to be used, there must be a standard key to it which is used by security agencies…these are very common norms- This is the only reason , nations like to hire mathemeticians and develop their own codes instead of publicly available encryption forumulas.


#16

The UK government has nothing to do with Blackberry service. RIM is a Canadian company based out of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

As far as encryption goes, if you are encrypting for the purpose of security, then you have nothing to be afraid of as far as governments are concerned; PGP serves that purpose.

I'm curious binaryzero, as a Global Network Operations Manager for an unnamed organization, are you based in Pakistan full time or are you simply visiting? The reason I ask, is that from a risk management perspective, Pakistan is a fundamentally dubious locale to operate out of.

I am not questioning the veracity of your statements, just curious, thats all. Feel free to email me if you like =)


#17

I keep thinking BB is Benazir Bhutto :P


#18

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I keep thinking BB is Benazir Bhutto :P
[/quote]

nah men, they are referring to Big Brother by BB.


#19

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The UK government has nothing to do with Blackberry service. RIM is a Canadian company based out of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

As far as encryption goes, if you are encrypting for the purpose of security, then you have nothing to be afraid of as far as governments are concerned; PGP serves that purpose.

I’m curious binaryzero, as a Global Network Operations Manager for an unnamed organization, are you based in Pakistan full time or are you simply visiting? The reason I ask, is that from a risk management perspective, Pakistan is a fundamentally dubious locale to operate out of.

I am not questioning the veracity of your statements, just curious, thats all. Feel free to email me if you like =)

[/quote]

me travelling most of the times - its more cheaper to have a backoffice network operations center in Pakistan rather than in USA. Gives more jobs to Pakistani and you know - we got talent here…


#20

wel k2munda i gues ur gues iz corect :P

and the guys above talkin about mail in n73

can u plz post the complete adreses and ports etc

i mean complete configuration plz 4 hotmail plz