SATA vs IDE which one is better?

want to see the experience ppl have about these hard disk types , i have one IDE and 3 sata drives in my system but frankly speaking IDE is more durable thn sata , bad sectors often come in SATA drives (dnt know y)

sata :i m using 500GB maxtor , 120 GB WD , 350GB seagate.

IDE :120GB IDE baracuda

IDE, caps out at a theoretical maximum transfer speed of 133 MB/ps, where SATA starts at 150MB/ps or 1.5GB/ps. There is also SATA II that supports up to 3GB/ps.

SATA is serial, IDE is parallel.

Both are based off of ATA technology.

IDE is more limited by devices supported. One channel supports two devices which must be set master/slave. SATA is always the master and more ports can usually be fit on a mobo.

even take a look at the new dell computers thay all have SATA cabled optical drives... if dell likes them they got to be good.

SATA is better, it is much more faster (3Gbps compared to ~150Mbps of IDE), some new motherboards don't even have IDE slots anymore. SATA cables are also thin (improves air flow) and easier to connect.

SATA or IDE don't have anything to do with bad sectors, these are just interfaces to transfer data from HDD to Motherboard.

You should buy IDE only if your motherboard does not have any SATA slot available.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

’]SATA or IDE don’t have anything to do with bad sectors, these are just interfaces to transfer data from HDD to Motherboard.

You should buy IDE only if your motherboard does not have any SATA slot available.

[/quote]

100% agreed. :)

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

’]SATA or IDE don’t have anything to do with bad sectors, these are just interfaces to transfer data from HDD to Motherboard.

You should buy IDE only if your motherboard does not have any SATA slot available.

[/quote]

+2

How can you forget the stupid cables of IDE. Hate those.

^ True that. Also, SATA gets corrupt more easily not due to SATA interface itself but because SATA interface usually come with bigger capacity HDDs having increased platter densities which in turn get damaged easily.

In my personal experience try to get a 5.25" HDD (instead of 3.5" HDD). Though, 3.5" is getting norm these days and really hard to find larger size HDD. The advantage is the larger surface area to efficiently remove more heat.

Secondly, pay attention to how many platters are in HDD. Try to get HDD with 1 platter because it will generate less heat compare to 3 platters HDD (just an example). HDD with 1 platter is always little more expensive than 3 platters HDD (more data density), in sense of capacity to price ratio.

Heat is a big issue for small electrical components (placed on PCB of HDD).

PATA cables also block air-flow as compare to SATA cables.

EDIT: By the way, I don't think manufacturers build 5.25" HDD anymore. Or do they?

5.25" HDD? :o

5.25" = CD/DVD drive

3.5" = Desktop HDD

2.5" = Notebook/laptop HDD

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Secondly, pay attention to how many platters are in HDD. Try to get HDD with 1 platter because it will generate less heat compare to 3 platters HDD (just an example). HDD with 1 platter is always little more expensive than 3 platters HDD (more data density), in sense of capacity to price ratio.

[/quote]

Lesser platters are good but that doesn’t mean that it has more data density (unless across HDD generations). The advantage of lesser number of platters is the reduction is the probability of mechanical failure due to armature, motor and other mechanical parts inside the HDD.

e.g. an older generation 120GB HDD might be 2 x 66GB platters while a newer generation HDD of same capacity might be 1 x 133GB platter.

Within the same generation, using a 133GB/platter data density for this example, a 120GB HDD will have 1 platter, a 250GB HDD will have 2 platters, 320GB to 400GB HDDs might have 3 platters, a 500GB HDD might have 4 platters and so on. The usable capacity/sectors/cylinders are defined in the HDD firmware.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
EDIT: By the way, I don’t think manufacturers build 5.25" HDD anymore. Or do they?
[/quote]

The only 5.25" HDD you will find these days is a 3.5" HDD inside a 5.25" lockable mobile enclosure.