Running 220v roti maker on 110v ac


#1

Hi I have purchased a roti maker 220v 2200watts and will take it to Canada. But there is only 110v and here it’s only 220v.

Can I run it directly on 110v?

Can I get 220v ac from joining two ac sources in series?

Like I take one end of ac and attach it to another source one end to make a series connection?
I am uploading a simple diagram to illustrate what I am thinking to do.
@ijaz
@Ijaz_Ahmed
@nadeem5476


#2

Use any commonly available 110V to 220V step up converter. Just make sure the output power requirements match.


#3

Thanks @asad I m unable to find any 110 to 220v converter.
However in market 220 to 110v converter are available in 2500 and 3000 watts output.

Can I just reverse their terminals like make the output terminal input and the input terminal the output this will reverse the step down actin to step up… One shopkeeper suggested doing so.

The converter available says 220v to 110v 3000 watts.

However if I reverse its action. Will its 220v side have enough capacity to drive 2200 watts load?

Since I believe the specs clearly says that 2500 or 3000 watts is at 110v side… But not sure what’s the output power rartig at 110v side if it’s action is reversed.

Also is the idea of connecting ac sources in series not good?

And what are the consequences of using it on 110v. I suspect its resistance/inductance/capacities (whichever used in the heating element) will stay constant but the lower voltage will just cause it to not get heated properly. Either it will eventually get heated or it won’t get heated at all?


#4

aik ticket main 2 mazay :slight_smile:


#5

[quote=“jhagra, post:3, topic:23877, full:true”]
Thanks @asad I m unable to find any 110 to 220v converter.
However in market 220 to 110v converter are available in 2500 and 3000 watts output.

Can I just reverse their terminals like make the output terminal input and the input terminal the output this will reverse the step down actin to step up… One shopkeeper suggested doing so.

The converter available says 220v to 110v 3000 watts.

However if I reverse its action. Will its 220v side have enough capacity to drive 2200 watts load? [/quote]

You can do that; reverse input and output. However, for local made converters, divide the rating by two to get actual safe usage rating. Or get one custom made from any capable UPS repair shop technician. It should be a simple enough job. Just ensure they use copper wire of appropriate gauge.

[quote=“jhagra, post:3, topic:23877, full:true”]
Since I believe the specs clearly says that 2500 or 3000 watts is at 110v side… But not sure what’s the output power rartig at 110v side if it’s action is reversed. [/quote]

Use “P = IV”; P being Power (Watts), V being Voltage (Volts) and I being current (Amperes).

[quote=“jhagra, post:3, topic:23877, full:true”]
Also is the idea of connecting ac sources in series not good?[/quote]

Can be done but different sources must be isolated and with same phase. Also, normal 110Vac 3 phase available there will have each 110Vac supply at a phase difference which won’t yield the required voltage waveform. Use a converter and be done with it. It’s pretty much plug and play, plus can be used with other 220Vac appliances too if and when needed.

It likely won’t be damaged (depends on design/circuitry) but it also won’t work as intended. Can you share model and any image of stated voltage/power rating on the device itself?


#6

Yes you can, but the heater inside will not give proper heat thus may not cook. Also if there is something other which is not a heater (e.g. some electronics, some motor etc.) may not work at all.

Technically possible but not recommended as DIY. To make a series connection of two AC sources, both must be in proper SYNC. So I would suggest to stay away from this idea.

On a side note, If you are thinking to make a series connection of two power sockets in your home, that would be a DISASTER. You will be effectively shorting your LIVE with NEUTRAL.

If you have a 3-Phase connection in Canada, the better solution would be to use 2 phases to run this 2200W device. Phase to phase voltage will be approximately 190 volts, sufficient to run this device. You will connect this device between any two phases (instead of Phase + Neutral which will only give you 110V)


#7

A 2kW 220v device connected to 110V may behave like a 4kW device. Probably will fry the input plug and may cause a fire. Finding a suitable 4kW step-up Transformer will cost you more that the cost of a new roti maker. Also it will weigh a Ton.

Any way the bottom line is that all these roti makers are no good. You always need to maintain a very precise consistency of dough to get a proper roti which is practically very difficult.

Best Regards
Farooq


#8

No, it will not. This is not induction motor, it’s a heater.

What is the logic behind this assumption ?


#9

If is drawing 10 amps from a 220v source, it will draw 20 amps from 110v source to achieve the same power. Home sockets are designed for 15 amps max.


#10

probably blow the fuse first so someone is saved…


#11

Again, Wrong.

Sorry but you are having misconceptions about basics of electrical power and electricity.

Why you think that power draw is a constant ?


#12

Just saying that I am wrong does not conclude anything. It is just simple as that P = VxI. Don’t mention power factor…I know about that.


#13

Do not try the series connection!

In the US and Canada, most houses have 1-2 outlets which are 220 volt for stoves, electric oven, clothes dryers, etc. These outlets have a different plug than the normal 110 volt plug which has two vertical parallel flat pins. You can use your 220 volt roti maker on these outlets by changing its plug to the US/Canada 220 volt plug (which has one vertical flat pin plus one horizontal flat pin and one U-shape ground pin).


#14

Also, in US and Canada there is no 3 phase supply.Their system uses only 2 phases, 180 degrees apart. That allows them to use either 110 volt (between any phase to neutral) for general (light) loads under 15 amps (which is 1,650 watts on 110 volts) or 220 volt (one phase to the other phase, without neutral) for heavy loads over 15 amps.


#15

I am not just saying, I am saying on the basis of established laws of electricity.

There is something called Ohm’s law, ever heard about it ?


#16

Thanos guys for your kind replies.
I tested it by connecting it to 110v and it was drawing hardly 5A using big 30A industrial grade transformer.
While on 220v it was drawing 10A at most.
It was making roti at 110v but that was very hard and took like 5 minutes for a single roti.

Our outside resolved by not sending it to Canada…


#17

@jhagra:

What is a “Roti Maker” ?.

Did you buy it from Pakistan ?. How much did it cost ?. Does it make edible rotis ?. At what speed per roti ?. Do you have to knead the dough yourself, or just put flour and water into it and it does the rest ?.

This is a serious inquiry. I need something
Iike this, if it does what it says.
 

Sheikh ‘Roti Eater’ Chilli