Role of women in law enforcement and anti-terrorism agencies


#1

Ever wonder why there are so few women involved with various law enforcement and anti-terrorism agencies? If so, please share any thoughts you might have.

It's not as if women are incompetent; technically or otherwise. That is, considering how they beat guys handily in the educational field. Check the newspapers if you don't believe me on this.

So then, how can women be encouraged to be more active in this field of work too?

Perhaps women already working in this field can act as an inspiration for other Pakistani women to join too?

An example... Islamabad Elite Force who provided security detail during SAARC conference:

isbeliteforece200emale1jx2.jpg

So... What do you think?


#2

err this thread made me remember my islamiat and chemistry teachers..

i dont mind female security, but the question is how different will they be from male security personnel.


#3

The assumption here is that they will be as effective as their male counterparts. It's also a sign of a more progressive Pakistan where both sexes have equal opportunity.


#4

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

err this thread made me remember my islamiat and chemistry teachers…
[/quote]

Did they used to discipline you using guns? Which school was it, for curiosity sake? :D


#5

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The assumption here is that they will be as effective as their male counterparts. It’s also a sign of a more progressive Pakistan where both sexes have equal opportunity.
[/quote]

Which also means more ideas, workforce, and partly economic improvement with less dependent members in each family.


#6

she looks hot.

we must have more of such female elite force units. In pindi specially. :)

by the way, there are many ppl who oppose muslim womens' working.

I think both men and women should work, and be treated almost equally.


#7

My experience with women immigration officers (FIA) at Airports was good. They treat you better than their male colleagues. At police License branch women acted better than men. My vote is for more & more women in law enforcement agencies.


#8

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

by the way, there are many ppl who oppose muslim womens’ working.

[/quote]

Yes, but for what reason? Is it even rationale or allowed by Islam? Or maybe it is just male chauvinism at its usual? Hazrat Khadija was a trader in Arabia when Prophet (PBUH) married her.


#9

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Yes, but for what reason? Is it even rationale or allowed by Islam? Or maybe it is just male chauvinism at its usual? Hazrat Khadija was a trader in Arabia when Prophet (PBUH) married her.

[/quote]

Just male chauvinism at its usual.


#10

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

by the way, there are many ppl who oppose muslim womens’ working.
[/quote]

i agree but apart from that people in their own family also oppose!


#11

Sure women should be able to do the job they want to, be it serving in the police or becoming a doctor or whatever - but the question remains: is our society willing to accept that? I don't think so, because like Saad said, even the people in their own families would (generally speaking) oppose it.

It's not religion, because I don't think Islam disallows women from having a job. It's just our culture and the way we treat women - part of it is protectionism, and part male chauvinism.

Its a good thing that the playing fields are being leveled for both sexes, but then I think women also need to be ready to face it through - that didn't come out right... an example: women want equal rights, but on the bus, they expect--nay, demand--that someone stand up instead and give them a place to sit.

I don't know - thin ice, so excuse me :)


#12

I agree with you Wzub. Women in Pakistan want equality and also special treatment. It can't go both ways. However, men making eyes at women working with them doesn't helps any. In the workplace, you need to develop a thick skin and move on.

The thing with law enforcement is that if someone gets frisky, you are trained to defend yourself and can give the perpetrator a kick in the ba||s. The fear of retaliation should keep most in line. Even in the West women face discrimination and sexual harassment. There are ways of dealing with it.


#13

^ For sure. Its a two-way thing; men and women both need to work on a better society where being a woman doesn't mean you get stared at and looked down upon at the same time.

There are all kinds of people in this World, but--again--men aren't the only ones that need to mend their mentality.


#14

Wow man. terrorists got lucky :D


#15

I don't think 'treating women with equality' is the same as common courtesy, like vacating your seat or opening the door or allowing a woman to pass through a door before you. To say, that if you 'want equal rights' then you give up claim for courteous behaviour is, if meant in all seriousness, quite immature.

Equality before the law is a fundamental human right that a significant segment of our population is often denied. One accords courtesy to the elderly as well, but you don't ask them to give up their rights in exchange.


#16

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The assumption here is that they will be as effective as their male counterparts. It’s also a sign of a more progressive Pakistan where both sexes have equal opportunity.
[/quote]

fair enough. but their male counterparts are not really effective. so they dont really have a tough competition. ;)


#17

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Did they used to discipline you using guns? Which school was it, for curiosity sake? :D

[/quote]

well those hammer like hands were more effective than guns. :P


#18

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Ever wonder why there are so few women involved with various law enforcement and anti-terrorism agencies? If so, please share any thoughts you might have.

It’s not as if women are incompetent; technically or otherwise. That is, considering how they beat guys handily in the educational field. Check the newspapers if you don’t believe me on this.

So then, how can women be encouraged to be more active in this field of work too?

Perhaps women already working in this field can act as an inspiration for other Pakistani women to join too?

An example… Islamabad Elite Force who provided security detail during SAARC conference:

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/9931/isbeliteforece200emale1jx2.jpg

So… What do you think?

[/quote]

For one thing, this picture speaks volumes about our women protecting our men’s right to pray and pass laws against them ;)


#19

Courtesy is necessary. Special treatment isn't.

Effectiveness is more about the professionalism prevalent in the agency.

The picture is just eye candy. ;)