Possible reason for delay in the launch of DTH


#21

I have heard from someone that in December DTH will be launched. But no proof. If its launched then FTA channels will not be any more FTA.

So don't launch it if FTA will get encrypted.


#22

^I read somewhere that DTH is just about to be launched.............about 5 years ago.


#23

It won't affect FTA channels but it depends. like specially entertainment and some most watched news channels they'll definitely encrypt. But there is a big "IF" DTH starts. and i guess it will never gonna happen.

PTV was asking Indian DTH providers for the help couple of years ago. Only one took interest. there were some terms and conditions so things lost in space. Whats happening, now no one knows.

ARY and Cross Currents will always look for foreign land for the setup. They can afford but it'll cost them a fortune.


#24

So many posts in this thread but no one is asking the obvious question. What is the advantage to the consumer of DTH? I don't care whether you beam the channels directly to my home via a satellite,use a coax cable or a high speed DSL connection like PTCL's offerings. What matters to me is whether you can offer me something better than the competition at an affordable price. So can DTH offer me something that I can't get via cable?

You guys are forgetting that one reason DTH is not coming to Pakistan is the fierce competition they are going to face from desi cable operators, worldcall and even PTCL. Where is the money in spending billions just so you can sell a Rs. 200 a month subscription to Pakistani homes?


#25

^Don't be so selfish. It's not only about you. There are 160-170 million people in Pakistan, all of whom deserve access to internet and media. Once DTH is deployed, people all over Pakistan can use it. Most of Pakistan's population is in rural areas, which usually don't have cable.


#26

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

^Don’t be so selfish. It’s not only about you. There are 160-170 million people in Pakistan, all of whom deserve access to internet and media. Once DTH is deployed, people all over Pakistan can use it. Most of Pakistan’s population is in rural areas, which usually don’t have cable.
[/quote]

You are very naive. Everyone is selfish! So your answer is that they are going to spend billions to set up shop in Pakistan and sell Rs. 200 a month connections to villagers? Ok I’ll bite! Any other possible advantages to DTH?


#27

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

So many posts in this thread but no one is asking the obvious question. What is the advantage to the consumer of DTH? I don’t care whether you beam the channels directly to my home via a satellite,use a coax cable or a high speed DSL connection like PTCL’s offerings. What matters to me is whether you can offer me something better than the competition at an affordable price. So can DTH offer me something that I can’t get via cable?

You guys are forgetting that one reason DTH is not coming to Pakistan is the fierce competition they are going to face from desi cable operators, worldcall and even PTCL. Where is the money in spending billions just so you can sell a Rs. 200 a month subscription to Pakistani homes?

[/quote]

There is no substitute of DTH in any form. there are so many advantages of DTH than any other medium. First coverage, second number of channels, third quality and so many more. Definitely DTH will give you much more than usual cable.

We are an unfortunate nation, we still don’t have proper infrastructure of cable tv in Pakistan, DTH is a thing of the future. But as we love to jump quickly to the next level before building a strong base. Things fall apart quickly when this happens. Im not afraid of competition but im afraid of whether DTH would be able to survive.


#28

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

^Don’t be so selfish. It’s not only about you. There are 160-170 million people in Pakistan, all of whom deserve access to internet and media. Once DTH is deployed, people all over Pakistan can use it. Most of Pakistan’s population is in rural areas, which usually don’t have cable.
[/quote]

An example:

http://www.ddinews.gov.in/DTH/DDDIRECT


#29

As highlighted, coverage and quality are the main advantages. As far as my experience with DSTv has been, here's what I can tell

DSTv had a number of interactive data services via satellite - such as the (formerly 7-day) 14-day EPG (called EEPG) (and timed too, so that when the program started, it would either remind you, or switch automatically to that channel), a radio-info box for DSTv-housed channels (for instance, there were 40 in-house radio channels, and each channel had the artist/title/album/composer info), other data channels (such as for news, weather, games etc etc - depended on the decoder software).

And then, with the newer DSDs, they were also PVRs (though they introduced that after we came to Pakistan). Oh, and you can customize your subscription too. While DSTv had less customizability (in the sense that their main bouquet was large - this was THEN), they did give you the option to sign up to the Indian bouquet (with Zee TV, Sony, B4U) and other foreign channels (obviously, the choices have increased now).

But the major things that I crave about DSTV were the EEPGs, program info box, and the clarity. Period. I got used to the channels eventually, and managed to change the parental code lock (via some crazy method) :P


#30

@rokra: Lets assume there are only 1 million subscribers (out of 170 million people) paying Rs.200/month. That is 200Million per month on its own. 5 Months' Fee = 1 Billion. And why are you complaining about the billions being spent? Private investors will spend it, not the government (it isn't gonna come out of our taxes). The government will sell licenses to DTH providers at a hefty price and make money from it.

Advantages for DTH:

-Quality

-Electronic Program Guide (set reminders and , browse through what's on the next few days too)

-Don't have to rely on the crappy wires connecting most of our cities

-Lesser outages/ Channels don't change randomly

-Higher Quality Set-Top Boxes, could play games/ interactive news or sports etc.

And Yes, people are selfish, but they shouldn't question someone else's progress, unless it effects them adversely.


#31

Dear rokra

I am just 2km away from the desi cable which you are talking about. 4 years have passed and they are not willing to provide cable in our village because they fear that cable might be stolen or in my opinion the original fear in their mind is that after so much distance the quality of signals might get worst and no one will buy it.

As far as your DSL is concerned, 2 years have passed and still PTCL making false promises that in the coming month ONU will be installed and blah blah....

@ everyone

65% of people are living in rural areas and if you make a very strong hypothesis with all IF's and BUT's then 50% of the pople in Pakistan are far away from DSL and desi cable wala.

So, I will support all quality wireless services which could fill such wide gap.

Do remember Balochistan also where distance between widely spread towns, cities is a big problem due to which gas, electricity and telephone type things are a big dream and they are waiting from a long time.

So promote, promote and promote quality wireless services if you really want to give some thing to your prople.


#32

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

@rokra: Lets assume there are only 1 million subscribers (out of 170 million people) paying Rs.200/month. That is 200Million per month on its own. 5 Months’ Fee = 1 Billion. And why are you complaining about the billions being spent? Private investors will spend it, not the government (it isn’t gonna come out of our taxes).
[/quote]

The Rs. 200 per month customer will have a leading loss of Rs. 3000 at least. Why is that? The company will have to absorb the cost of installation and the set top box if it is to make any head way in our price conscious market.

I don’t think even the largest cable operators in Pakistan have a million customers despite the fact that they serve cities like Karachi which is home to 18 million souls. Villagers are poorer and they have power cuts that are more severe than in urban areas. How much money can you make in such an environment?

In the end its never about just how much money you can make off off DTH but also about how much money you could make with some other business. Its probably more profitable to invest billions in sugar mills or fertilizer factories than in DTH.

One other point about set top boxes. Worldcall’s analog cable service offers pretty good quality. But they are also now selling a digital service with a set top box. But the number of subscribers to this digital service are much lower. Do you know why? Because it is expensive and the benefits are not worth it.

So you guys can make up all sorts of reasons as to why DTH has not come to Pakistan but when I question the business sense of it I am the that is complaining?

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

And Yes, people are selfish, but they shouldn’t question someone else’s progress, unless it effects them adversely.

[/quote]

I was simply asking what benefit DTH provides to consumers. Why you’re reading malice into that I don’t know.

It seems that you guys prefer posts that blame PEMRA or the govt. for our troubles. Posts which question the benefits to investors or consumers are taken to be malicious for some reason.


#33

How can it not benefit investors? Think of it as the Telecom sector. It had an initial cost (Mobile Phone) and it has a monthly cost (for whatever they use, even poor families have 2-3 phones each). I bet there were skeptics back then, but now we know how successful they are (except Paktel and Instaphone, mainly because there is just space for so many competitors in one field).

India has about 16 Million DTH subscriptions, if Pakistan has the same ratio, it should be around 2 million subscriptions here. Do read this article, about how DTH Providers in India are drawing support from rural areas (villagers):

http://www.televisionpoint.com/news2009/newsfullstory.php?id=1252499760


#34

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

How can it not benefit investors? Think of it as the Telecom sector. It had an initial cost (Mobile Phone) and it has a monthly cost (for whatever they use, even poor families have 2-3 phones each). I bet there were skeptics back then, but now we know how successful they are (except Paktel and Instaphone, mainly because there is just space for so many competitors in one field).

India has about 16 Million DTH subscriptions, if Pakistan has the same ratio, it should be around 2 million subscriptions here. Do read this article, about how DTH Providers in India are drawing support from rural areas (villagers):

http://www.televisionpoint.com/news2009/newsfullstory.php?id=1252499760

[/quote]

You can’t compare the likes of TATA to any company in Pakistan. TATA is HUGE! Its a multi-billion dollar group of companies with interests in many many different industries. They have very deep pockets and can afford to absorb the initial cost of such a rollout. There is no company like TATA in Pakistan.

Also if you’ve seen the TATA sky ads you know they aren’t going out of their way to target villagers. Ads set in gyms or in fancy homes are not aimed at villagers.

Its not just the infrastructure investment. There is also the investment in:

Marketing: How are you going to reach all those villages? How can you advertise to them?

CPEs which will have to be provided for free

Labour costs You will have to hire quite the workforce to cover all those far flung villages. You will have to spend on training them too. Just because you don’t have to lay cables doesn’t mean that you don’t have to spend because of the vast distances involved.

I find it amusing that I have to explain these things in so much detail. Name one large company that has its headquarters in a village or small town or which is investing billions targeting the rural market from the get go?

The telecom companies are all based in the urban areas and all of them first targeted the urban market. After many years of making money off the urban market and recovering their investment many times over did they look to the rural market. They did that only when the urban areas reached saturation and there was no more room for growth in the cities.


#35

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

How can it not benefit investors? Think of it as the Telecom sector. It had an initial cost (Mobile Phone) and it has a monthly cost (for whatever they use, even poor families have 2-3 phones each).
[/quote]

You can’t compare the telecom sector to the TV industry because there are many many people in Pakistan who own a mobile but not a TV set!


#36

^

IMO there are more chances of foreign sheikhs investing in DTH than Pakistanis doing so.

Marketing: Even newspapers would be effective to spread the word at first. Rest will probably go on by word of mouth. It might take longer to get more customers though, specially from villages.

CPEs: The cost or atleast a part of it has to be paid by the customer. I'm sure they won't give it away for free.

Labour Costs: Usually these companies set up their offices in cities. But if some problem arises they go onto nearby villages to help them out.

They don't need to target villages, or make their headquarters in some village. They just need the service to be available. Villagers can go buy decoders from nearby cities and use it in their homes. They will get customers from cities too, but those customers already have access to media.

BTW not all village population is poor. Maybe few would be able to afford it in the beginning, but it'll spread. Just like the telecom sector. I can remember the time we had Vwireless phones installed in our village. The phone had a cost of like around Rs.4000 at that time. And PTCL sent people to set up those phones to our tiny village of not more than 20 houses I believe. Still they sold 5 or 6 phones.

BTW people did not have mobile phones before the telecom sector started up, they obviously got it after it started up.


#37

rokra dude

I think you are enjoying some post in pemra. lol


#38

PEMRA has been trying to launch DTH. Its because of their inefficiency that DTH has not been launched. If DTH is so awful and not worth investing in, why are there 6 DTH companies (+1 State run DTH) in India?

Once the satellites start working right and we're ready to sell DTH, just wait and watch how many investors will rush for it.


#39

In 2011 Pakistan going to launch Paksat 1R and it will be replacing the previous Paksat. May be at that time they gonna invite DTH to use their satelite.

That satelite's footprint will be in Asia, Africa and Europe.


#40

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

PEMRA has been trying to launch DTH. Its because of their inefficiency that DTH has not been launched. If DTH is so awful and not worth investing in, why are there 6 DTH companies (+1 State run DTH) in India?

Once the satellites start working right and we’re ready to sell DTH, just wait and watch how many investors will rush for it.

[/quote]

Why Pakistanis continue to compare themselves to India I will never understand :).

India is a larger market. Richer advertisers, more consumers and much larger companies like TATA which can make huge investments. Economies of scale make things cheaper in India. India is also a larger country so the wireless nature of DTH is more of an advantage there than in Pakistan.

Anyway I hope DTH does launch in Pakistan if only to increase competition. Competition is a good for the consumer.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
rokra dude

I think you are enjoying some post in pemra. lol

[/quote]

LOL no man I am self employed. The Internet is where I earn my living.