Physicist Claims First Real Demonstration of Cold Fusion


#1

Physicist Claims First Real Demonstration of Cold Fusion

by Lisa Zyga

On May 22 researchers at Osaka University presented the first demonstration of cold fusion since an unsuccessful attempt in 1989 that has clouded the field to this day.

On May 22, researchers at Osaka University presented the first demonstration of cold fusion since an unsuccessful attempt in 1989 that has clouded the field to this day.

To many people, cold fusion sounds too good to be true. The idea is that, by creating nuclear fusion at room temperature, researchers can generate a nearly unlimited source of power that uses water as fuel and produces almost zero waste. Essentially, cold fusion would make oil obsolete.

However, many experts debate whether money should be spent on cold fusion research or applied to more realistic alternative energy solutions. For decades, researchers around the world have been simply trying to show that cold fusion is indeed possible, but they´ve yet to take that important first step.

Now, esteemed Physics Professor Yoshiaki Arata of Osaka University in Japan claims to have made the first successful demonstration of cold fusion. Last Thursday, May 22, Arata and his colleague Yue-Chang Zhang of Shianghai Jiotong University presented the cold fusion demonstration to 60 onlookers, including other physicists, as well as reporters from six major newspapers and two TV studios. If Arata and Zhang´s demonstration is real, it could lead to a future of new, clean, and cheap energy generation.

In their experiment, the physicists forced deuterium gas into a cell containing a mixture of palladium and zirconium oxide, which absorbed the deuterium to produce a dense "pynco" deuterium. In this dense state, the deuterium nuclei from different atoms were so close together that they fused to produce helium nuclei.

Evidence for the occurrence of this fusion came from measuring the temperature inside the cell. When Arata first injected the deuterium gas, the temperature rose to about 70° C (158° F), which Arata explained was due to nuclear and chemical reactions. When he turned the gas off, the temperature inside the cell remained warmer than the cell wall for 50 hours, which Arata said was an effect of nuclear fusion.

While Arata´s demonstration looked promising to his audience, the real test is still to come: duplication. Many scientists and others are now recalling the infamous 1989 demonstration by Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, who claimed to produce controlled nuclear fusion in a glass jar at room temperature. However, no one - including Fleischmann and Pons - could duplicate the experiment, leading many people to consider cold fusion a pseudoscience to this day.

But one witness at the recent demonstration, physicist Akito Takahashi of Osaka University, thought that the experiment should be able to be repeated.

"Arata and Zhang demonstrated very successfully the generation of continuous excess energy [heat] from ZrO2-nano-Pd sample powders under D2 gas charging and generation of helium-4," Takahashi told New Energy Times. "The demonstrated live data looked just like data they reported in their published papers [J. High Temp. Soc. Jpn, Feb. and March issues, 2008]. This demonstration showed that the method is highly reproducible."

In addition, researchers will have to repeat the experiment with larger amounts of the palladium and zirconium oxide mixture in order to generate larger quantities of energy.

Source

Heres your solution to the worlds energy problems! If cold fusion works, it'll effectively revolutionize energy production/consumption, as well as world economies.


#2

this is amazing and will do wonders for the world

and may also reduce global warming


#3

nyc....sum1 should put a link of that, unsucessfull attempt picture, it would be really kewl..


#4

International Thermonculear Experimental Reactor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER

fusion reactor being built in France


#5

well the Oil marketing companies will spend Trillions of $s to throw this technology out of the picture.


#6

The fusion reactor built in France is based on 'hot fusion', which requires high pressure and temperature for the reaction to take place. Cold fusion is essentially the same reaction at around room temperature and pressure, so it has obvious benefits.

@abdulsami: If this actually works, and its obviously receiving a lot of media attention, then oil companies will not have a lot of control over the situation. And I think these companies keep up with scientific advances, and I'm sure they plan for the future by diversifying their energy base. I'm sure they're not sitting there, hoping no one will develop a viable alternative energy source in the near future!

Problem is, there have been numerous attempts at cold fusion, all of which failed spectacularly after receiving media hype, and hence people are really skeptical and wary about similar claims now.


#7

Cold fusion may be possible as it has not been proven (yet) as an impossibility. Still it is very very likely that this experiment is just a way to grab investor's money. Last time I read, if cold fusion could actually work, most of the energy problems on earth will get solved.


#8

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The fusion reactor built in France is based on ‘hot fusion’, which requires high pressure and temperature for the reaction to take place. Cold fusion is essentially the same reaction at around room temperature and pressure, so it has obvious benefits.

@abdulsami: If this actually works, and its obviously receiving a lot of media attention, then oil companies will not have a lot of control over the situation. And I think these companies keep up with scientific advances, and I’m sure they plan for the future by diversifying their energy base. I’m sure they’re not sitting there, hoping no one will develop a viable alternative energy source in the near future!

Problem is, there have been numerous attempts at cold fusion, all of which failed spectacularly after receiving media hype, and hence people are really skeptical and wary about similar claims now.

[/quote]

Nuclear reactors use fission and not fusion. Fission is breaking down of large unstable nuclei into smaller more stable nuclei while fusion is the other way round. In a nuclear reactor’s case, the large nuclei of uranium isotopes are broken down into smaller nuclei.


#9

^ Was that addressed at me? Cause I was talking about fusion not fission...!


#10

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

^ Was that addressed at me? Cause I was talking about fusion not fission…!
[/quote]

Yup. No fusion takes place in nuclear reactors. It’s only fission.


#11

^ The experimental reactor built in France is to test out nuclear FUSION.


#12

Whoops, my bad. Thought you were talking about reactors in general


#13

The concept is mind blowing and out right revolutionary. But guys we, the PAKISTANIS won't have to worry about cold fusion for at least a 100 years. Am I right? Of course I am!!


#14

If cold fusion works. Its cheap plentiful energy for everyone. Pakistan could obviously benefit from it.


#15

its cool...... i was just wondering abt sum thing like this cuz re-read angel and deamons empth-teen time