Need opinion on cheap no name (tata bp solar / celgerman ) aka college road panels

Hi, today i visited college road rawalpindi and found abundant of cheap 150watt panels .. they were for 6200rs .. these were either celgerman or tata bp solar.. any review about them ? i hope somone out there be using these cheapos somewhere in pakistan . need some critical /indepth reviews on them ..

You get what you pay for. Usually for such items, markets like College Road are dumping grounds for reject lots. Be wary. Very very wary.

Forget the salesman's "rating", ask shop for volt-amp meter (or take your own), place panel in mid-day sunlight perpendicular to sun, measure volts and amps output and multiply these two readings. That will give you the maximum possible output of the panel in watts. De-rate by say 50% for real life fixed angle year round usable power. Do exact same exercise with "branded" panel and compare watts produced and cost/watt. Keep in mind that life of cheaper panel may be less than branded panel.

Well that is pretty much true. What I am interested in it done real figures. I don't see any critical review on it?

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bro buy a unit-203 , then go to shop and check the figure of panel , at noon , this will tell you the whole story.............

Even a rupee spent on these panels would be down the drain.

Aurangzeb

All are bashing these but market is full of them and they are doing a roaring business. What's the f ?

Anyone who have some real experience with them?

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[quote=“jhagra, post:7, topic:22213”]

All are bashing these but market is full of them and they are doing a roaring business. What’s the f ?

[/quote]

That merely speaks to demand from people who don’t know anything about it and so are easily fooled, not about its long term reliability or quality.

[quote=“Asad, post:8, topic:22213”]

That merely speaks to demand from people who don’t know anything about it and so are easily fooled, not about its long term reliability or quality.

[/quote]

Yes. Read (http://www.energymatters.com.au/solar-power/solar-consumer-guide/)

Excerpt:

Grey market/counterfeit products

It’s not all that common, but in some cases in order to save money a company will obtain components on the grey market. This is where the component is genuine, but hasn’t come through the proper supply channels. This is also referred to as a “parallel import“. In these situations, if something goes wrong with the component, the manufacturer may not honour the warranty. In fact, a couple of major solar panel manufacturers have already stated they would not honour warranty on parallel imported panels – modules must be purchased via authorised Australian distributors.

It’s important to check with the company you are considering acquiring a system from that either they are an authorised distributor, or have sourced the panels through a local authorised wholesaler.

In extreme cases, counterfeit or cheaper “no-name” products will be used. This can not only prove more costly as the equipment won’t be eligible for rebates, but the equipment may not perform as well as established brands and present fire/electrocution hazards through shoddy workmanship. Look for proper certifications. The ‘CE Mark’ from Europe alone is worthless in Australia for solar panels as it’s a self-certification. In the case of solar panels, the safety standard IEC61730 apply, the panel must be classified as Class A modules as well as complying with either IEC61215 or IEC61646, depending on the module technology.

Low quality components

Not all solar panels are equal. While most panels will perform as rated in perfect conditions, poor quality panel performance will drop off dramatically in marginal conditions. “No name” panels may also use poor quality sealants that will do the job for the first couple of years, but then after that degrade to a point moisture enters the panel – and there is no easy fix for that situation.

An item often not closely scrutinised in a solar power system package is the inverter. An inverter is the device than converts DC electricity from the panels into AC electricity suitable for use in your home. Sometimes a package might have top brand solar panels, but may skimp on the inverter quality in order to maintain an attractive price point. A low quality inverter will be inefficient and may have a shorter lifespan. Being an expensive item to replace, be sure a good quality inverter is included in your solar power system.

A good place for consumers to start when offered a PV package is to ask for the brand name for each component and then to research the brand history on the Internet.

Please see bold and underlined part before considering the college road panels.

The second one is what Neo_x faces.

Aurangzeb