Light Ain't the Fastest Anymore...!

NEW YORK—

Some questions and answers about the experiment that appeared to show particles speeding faster than light.

Q. What is being reported?

A. Over the past two years, Europeans scientists shot more than 15,000 particles called neutrinos from Geneva through Earth's crust to an underground lab 454 miles away in Italy. They found that the particles appeared to travel just a tiny bit faster than the speed of light -- just 20 parts per million faster. That was a surprise because the speed of light, about 186,000 miles per second, is supposed to be the fastest anything can move.

Q. Why has this caused such a stir?

A. It threatens Einstein's special theory of relativity, a bedrock of modern physics that Albert Einstein produced in 1905. That theory sets the speed of light as the cosmic speed limit for material objects, although it's better known for the equation E equals mc2, which basically says mass and energy can be changed into each other. If that theory is proven wrong, it could dramatically shake up our understanding of basic laws of the universe.

Q. And would that affect my daily life?

A. Not for now. It's impossible to say what unknown physical effects might be exploited, and how. The findings -- even if proven -- may end up as nothing more than a footnote in physics textbooks, or they could lead to new technological breakthroughs. As one skeptic jokingly said, if it's real, people "could use `neutrinomail' rather than email. It's faster."

Q. How likely is it that this finding is correct?

A. Experts are skeptical. Einstein's relativity theory has withstood a lot of experimental tests over the years. The scientists who reported the finding say they're still looking for flaws in their experimental procedures, and they've asked other labs to try to duplicate the results.

Q. What kind of flaws could there be?

A. The measurement is very complex, and all kinds of factors can enter in. For example, when the results were formally presented at a seminar Friday, a scientist in the audience suggested that the position of the moon could make a difference, because its gravity can deform the terrestrial crust through which the neutrinos passed. A spokesman for the researchers said that didn't appear to be a problem.

Q. So what happens now?

A. Scientists at Fermilab in Illinois have already started planning their own experiment. They have some experience. In 2007, they got a similar result, but the margin of error in their measurements was too big to make a definitive claim.

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Frank Jordans in Geneva contributed to this report.

Courtesy: Chicago Tribune News

If that simple equation E=MC (square of C that is speed of light) can laid human being to atomic explosives then think yourself if the experiments quoted above will lead us where?

Technology has both positive and negative impacts on our daily life for sure. May be our generation would not know about this research and it's results that may be good and even bad, but for sure upcoming generation will face it for sure.

Neutrinos are very small, so small (Mass-less) that they can pass through anything (even the earth) so its possible that they can travel faster then speed of light. Cause to be able to travel equal to speed of light, one has to be mass-less cause when your traveling at the speed of light, your mass tends to infinity which also requires infinite amount of energy.

Pack your bags folks, we are going back to school to learn new stuff in next few years :)

But that doesn't mean that it nullify everything we have learned so far about nature. When Einstein gave theory of relativity, it doesn't just nullify the laws given by Newton. Trust me, apple still falls to ground. :)

Similarly, it doesn't mean that everything that we based on theory of relativity is just garbage now. Things we based on it still works.

Moreover, even it is proven to Sigma level 5, but it haven't yet proven by independent experiments (that even the team who conducted these experiments admitted it). But I have little doubts that new findings will be proven wrong. If proven by experiments by science community then at most we can say that the theory of relativity is flawed but we can't just throw it out of window completely.

But hey guys, cheer up, now we have new things to learn. YAY! :)

@wampyr Good to see you back man, whats up? We hardly see you anymore.

There are a few things i like to be ignorant about. Like Pluto is still a planet to me, Light will still be the fastest to me. Isn't it good to have the power to believe in anything we want? :D

[quote=“Upsilon, post:5, topic:15693”]

@wampyr Good to see you back man, whats up? We hardly see you anymore.

There are a few things i like to be ignorant about. Like Pluto is still a planet to me, Light will still be the fastest to me. Isn’t it good to have the power to believe in anything we want? :D

[/quote]

I wanted to add something but you already said you like to be ignorant… :(:lol:

[quote=“Upsilon, post:5, topic:15693”]

@wampyr Good to see you back man, whats up? We hardly see you anymore.

[/quote]

I have been very busy with “worldly” stuff. All thanks to f****** judicial system of Pakistan. We also have our own “theory of special relativity of laws of Pakistan”. It can get beaten by snails in race and this “law” doesn’t get affected by speed of light. :)

so we will be going to moon? :lol:

other then its new and astonishing...as still most of the physicists are going to try this experiment to re-confirm it..but the matter of fact is that think of technological advances. this will be a new breakthrough for telecommunication sector. And a new world is out there to be explored now.

[quote=“mysterio92, post:8, topic:15693”]

so we will be going to moon? :lol:

[/quote]

Your late, cause we have been there over 50 years ago…