How To Setup A 'Multiple Switch' Operated Motor?


#21

@aurangzebhaque:

Our plumbing was put in with the design to sustain

high prs. The pressure pump was also installed to

work around the clock. This arrangement is quite

common these days and just about every home

around here has this installed. It looks like this:

The working of such a prs. pump is explained here.

Although the pump remains "ON", it only runs when

pressure drops in the water line, ie; somebody opens

a tap somewhere. When the desired prs. is reached,

the pump auto switches off.

Of course with water shortage in KHI, it isn't feasible

to keep it running all the time. Hence, the idea for

putting in switches in individual baths, to make the

facility available for judicious use.

@farhan_ds:

You need Alladin Ka Chiragh to find a plumber down

here who knows his stuff and/or won't FUBAR your

system and walk away. You go to a pump wallah, he

wants to sell you his pump. You go to a plumber, he

has either never seen a pump like yours, or wants to

refurbish your entire plumbing system until he can

send his nikhattoo brother to Dubai, on your dime.

Competent, hard working and honest. As one who

has to deal with them, you will be lucky to find even

one of these qualities in today's labour market.

Sheikh 'Pressurized' Chilli


#22

@pressurized chilli

if you rub your lamp the right way (sexual innuendo) , you wont have o rely on magic alone.. there are shops in local markets in your residential area where they sell plumbing and motor stuff.. not brandereth road, just your local small market.. they all have their own plumbers and electricians always sitting on shops looking for work. since they have been working on that shop contractually for long times, they are not only good at work, and despite a slightly high labor rate, they will come to your home and check the problem and suggest easiest solutions for free 1st time... since their shops are small and they are only gonna get the stuff from their own shops, they will work out your solution for the minimal and locally available in-shop material only.. so that solves a lot of problems of cost and high end equipment.

and since mashwara is free 1st time, you can consult different shops for different ideas.


#23

This has nothing to do with pressure. Infact a return line to the overhead tank would need to be installed so that water runs in a loop and pressure in the main is raised by 1-2 psi for good flow. High pressure such as generated by a pump with high head will seriously reduce the life of your faucets and other fittings since these are not designed for it.

Aurangzeb


#24

Update:

With all your help and mufeed mashwarey was

able to put it into practice and MA it is working

flawlessly now. We had a few minor hiccups

along the way, like having to change a half Doz

T-cocks which started to leak as soon as the prs

inside the pipes got ratcheted up to 35 psi.

Since the prs pump is attatched to the main line

out of the overhead tank, which also goes into the

geezer, we essentially now have pressurized cold

and hot lines when the pump is turned on. No more

waiting for hot water to show up on cold mornings.

There is one thing though. I used double pole

single throw 20Amps switches, which have cute

amber lights which turn on when the 2 circuits

inside (live+neutral) are switched on. Since I am

using the switches in series for the LIVE wire only,

I am using the GROUND wire as NEUTRAL to turn

the lights inside on/off.

I know you are not supposed to use the GROUND

terminal for NEUTRAL (return) purposes, but I don't

see another way out, since GROUND is the only

choice available. I guess the GROUND will remain

energized now, as long as the switch is turned on.

Anybody familiar with DPST switches per chance ?.

Sheikh 'Sanu Nehr Walay Pole' Chilli


#25

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I used double pole

single throw 20Amps switches, which have cute

amber lights which turn on when the 2 circuits

inside (live+neutral) are switched on.
[/quote]

Confusion

do they turn on or do they turn YOU on?


#26

[quote=“sheikh_chilli, post:24, topic:21660”]

,......which also goes into the

geezer, we essentially now have pressurized cold

and hot lines when the pump is turned on. No more

waiting for hot water to show up on cold mornings.

There is one thing though. I used double pole

single throw 20Amps switches, which have cute

amber lights which turn on when the 2 circuits

inside (live+neutral) are switched on.

Anybody familiar with DPST switches per chance ?.

[/quote]

Putting 35 PSI into a geyser, in my opinion is an unsafe thing to do. Anyway since you have installed the system now I would strongly suggest that you have a pressure gauge installed to monitor pressure.

DPST or Double Pole Single Throw are essentially two simple on/off switches that are connected physically so that both ON and OFF actions are simultaneous. There is very little or no use for DPST switches in a normal domestic electrical system.

From what I understand, you are using a 15 Amp power plug like the ones used in air-conditioner connections to control the pressure pump motor. That is just fine and will work. I hope you have not installed these inside the bathroom where the person using the shower - is required to operate the switch under wet conditions. Again this is a hazardous and unsafe way of doing things as we all know that the electric shock is more severe if ones hand/feet are wet. Other than that there is no need to go to DPST switches for this system.

Aurangzeb


#27

^ Best safety advices ever..

Death to all Chilli...


#28

@aurangzebhaque:

Not to worry. Our system was put in by professionals

who do it for a living. Somehow I get the feeling that

this setup is not as commonplace in whereever you are

and where I am situated.

Coming back to the DPST, it is a 20Amps Orange switch.

I am only concerned with the cute (as in kittens and

Chinese babies) amber light coming on, to which end

I am using the GROUND as NEUTRAL.

How unsafe that is ?, that, is the Qs.

Sheikh 'Spear' Chilli


#29

Use of Ground as Neutral is also very bad practice because it is unsafe. Substantial current flowing into the Ground will cause safety systems (Ground Current Fault) to operate. Your small light is probably a Neon Lamp which does not conduct significant amount of current.

Are you sure that Ground Line is being used as Neutral? Can you post some pics of the back of the switch so I can see the connections.

Aurangzeb


#30

@aurangzebhaque:

At the back of the switch you have the NEUTRAL,

LIVE and GROUND. Plus two tiny wires for the

amber light.

I have taken one small wire and put it in with the

NEUTRAL and the other wire in with GROUND.

Since the switch is being used for the LIVE wire

in series, we don't have a NEUTRAL. The light is

getting 220V and it's sending back 220V over the

1.5 GROUND wire.

Is that safe?, to use the thin GROUND wire for

sustained 220V through it ?.

Sheikh 'Zameeni Haqaiq' Chilli


#31

[quote=“sheikh_chilli, post:30, topic:21660”]

I have taken one small wire and put it in with the

NEUTRAL and the other wire in with GROUND.

Is that safe?, to use the thin GROUND wire for

sustained 220V through it ?.

[/quote]

I am afraid you cannot do much in this kind of power plug because there is no access to the socket. However I will describe the method.

First remove the small wire from the GROUND terminal. Leave the other small wire connected to the NEUTRAL terminal. Now if you unscrew the plastic covering you will find the on/off contact, that makes or breaks when the switch is toggled. You need to connect the second small wire to the socket side of the contact and NOT on the LINE side. If you are able to do this the amber light will come on when somebody switches ON the pressure pump and act as a visual reminder to switch off when finished using the hot water.

As done now it is incorrect. Since the load (the amber lamp) is very small, there is no problem of Ground Current.

Aurangzeb


#32

@aurangzebhaque:

Thanks. I will take apart the spare switch I have and see

if I can navigate to the right side of the contact.

Much appreciated.

Sheikh 'We Have Contact' Chilli


#33

Sheikh Sahib,

Just checking in to get a report about your pressurized system's performance. A performance review and sharing of experience will certainly benefit others.

Aurangzeb


#34

@Auranzebhaque:

Why certainly. The whole system is MA operating as intended,

flawlessly. Thanks to all of you, who contributed their valuable

insights and provided timely guidance. Without which, it could

have been a 'shocking' experience. :)

For now, I have left the amber LED light hooked into the ground

wire. So now, whenever the pump has been turned ON by anybody

in the series configuration, LEDs in every switch light up. It's imp-

ortant, because we don't want the prs. pump to inadvertently

remain available. Water is precious.

One interesting thing though. I don't know if it's something I

did with the wiring, or how they wired the generator, but when the

generator turns on, the LEDs light up in the switches, while they

are in the off position. Must be something to do with the ground

wire. Even so, how is the circuit being completed ?. It's supposed

to be off.

Sheikh 'Ghost In The Circuit' Chilli


#35

For a float switch:

  1. Step 1: Define Your Low Point. …
  2. Step 2: Mount The Float Switch. …
  3. Step 3: Adjust Your Weight. …
  4. Step 4: Wiring. …
  5. Step 1: Define your High Point. …
  6. Step 2: Adjust Your Weight. …
  7. Step 3: Mount The Float Switch. …
  8. Step 4: Wiring.

That’s how we do it and Folsom Heating and Air


#36

Just use one pressure switch mounted at pump to detect drop in pressure when tap is opened and start pump, then detect rise in pressure when tap is closed to shut off pump. This is cheapest, safest and most commonly used system in Pakistan and internationally. See following video for details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_HfvvOASnk These pressure switches are available in local market where pressure pumps are sold, in both genuine and look alike Chinese models at reasonable price. This way no one has to manually turn on or off any switch at all.