How to decide which battery to buy for 600 Watts UPS

Assalam-U-Alaikum, I searched in Google and found you website. I am hoping that you'll help me in what I want to ask. I have a UPS(Inverter) of 600 Watt from which I am running 4 fans (60 Watt each) and 10 energy saver bulbs (13Watt each). 2 Lead Acid batteries (used in cars) of 12volts 60Amp and 65Amp each are connected in parallel. After 3 months the UPS kept on charging batteries and 1 of the batteries (65Amp) got very heat up. So when checked one of the batteries (65Amp) got dead i.e. one of it's 6 cells got dry. Can anyone tell me what is the reason that this battery got dead while the other one is still working fine even after 1 year.

Now I want to buy 1 big battery (used in buses) so that it'll be easier for me to do maintenance in which after every month I've to put water in it. There are many brands available in our market (Pakistan (country)) i.e. Volta, Osaka, AGS, FB, Exide, some shopkeepers say Volta is good some say Exide is good, some people say FB or AGS is good, so I don't know which 1 to buy. Can you please also tell me whether I should buy 150Amp Lead Acid battery for my 600Watts UPS or 200Amp battery for the same UPS (Actually inverter). In our country 220Volts are used just as in UK and not 110 Volts.

Someone told me that he is using Volta battery and he puts water in it after every 2 or 3 days. But I used to put water in my Exide batteries after a month and someone else I know used to put water in his AGS battery after 3 months.

Please tell me how can I decide that which lead acid battery is good. Prices of all are almost same. Excid is old.

Can you please also tell me from where can I get you newly launched maintenance free battery and what is the cost of that battery and is it really Lead Acid battery.

I’ll be very thankful for the reply.

Best regards,

Idrees.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Assalam-U-Alaikum, I searched in Google and found you website. I am hoping that you’ll help me in what I want to ask. I have a UPS(Inverter) of 600 Watt from which I am running 4 fans (60 Watt each) and 10 energy saver bulbs (13Watt each). 2 Lead Acid batteries (used in cars) of 12volts 60Amp and 65Amp each are connected in parallel. After 3 months the UPS kept on charging batteries and 1 of the batteries (65Amp) got very heat up. So when checked one of the batteries (65Amp) got dead i.e. one of it’s 6 cells got dry. Can anyone tell me what is the reason that this battery got dead while the other one is still working fine even after 1 year.
[/quote]

First, look around in the fourm for UPS batteries and you will find a lot of information. When you connect two batteries in parallel or series they need to be of the same amperage. If you had the two connected in parallel then the UPS will only charge uptill 60 amp battery and then it will stop charging. Your 65 amp battery will remain at 60 and this is not good for a battery. Battery needs to be fully charged otherwise the plates get damaged.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Now I want to buy 1 big battery (used in buses) so that it’ll be easier for me to do maintenance in which after every month I’ve to put water in it. There are many brands available in our market (Pakistan (country)) i.e. Volta, Osaka, AGS, FB, Exide, some shopkeepers say Volta is good some say Exide is good, some people say FB or AGS is good, so I don’t know which 1 to buy. Can you please also tell me whether I should buy 150Amp Lead Acid battery for my 600Watts UPS or 200Amp battery for the same UPS (Actually inverter). In our country 220Volts are used just as in UK and not 110 Volts.

[/quote]

You need a deep cycle battery for UPS like the Volta/Osaka IT series. I recommend 140 amp/hr battery with a 600 W UPS. I think the max battery size for most Chinese inverters being sold in Pakistan is 160 amp/hr. The built in charger will not be able to charge a 200 amp/hr battery properly.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Someone told me that he is using Volta battery and he puts water in it after every 2 or 3 days. But I used to put water in my Exide batteries after a month and someone else I know used to put water in his AGS battery after 3 months.

[/quote]

You need to add the water to maintain the water level between the top and bottom line on the battery. The actual time to refill depends on usage and room temp.

Aoa Idrees,

to begin with the name of Allah the Almighty, the most beneficent and merciful... i read all your post from top to bottom and have realized your situation very well. i hope my answers would satisfy your questions fully, first off i would like you to buy a battery of 140 amp/hr of any brand you can as all the brands use the same material and not some rocket science... its just a brand game played on margin rules by battery manufacturers. coming to your other question of battery being dried is totally the fault of UPS and the end consumers; ups manufacturers, just to show the performance of their ups, by providing fast charging time increases the required current that normally #$%# up the batteries on the expense of their customers. customers on the same hand fall in love with the performance of a ups that charges batteries in 30 - 50 minutes unknowingly that batteries life cycle is going to get minimum, hence fall in your situation.

technically speaking, a normal battery requires an amount of current of 20 amp max to charge and the amount of time required is totally dependent over the usage of it. for instance and batt of 100 amp/hr would require half an our to be precise for recharging. anyhow, i would like you to have your ups checked by your vendor as it might have some problems of over charging, the circuit that cuts off charging can also malfunction due to the heavy ampere load.

P.S. dont go for a dry battery unless its of multinational brands.

regards,

Ahsan.

A o A

I searched alote on the batteries and at the end i found that the # 1 battery of pakistan is AGS.

The suitable battery for your 600W UPS is 140 to 150 AH.

And if you want to buy a mentanace free battery then homeage (125 AH) is best one according to its price and quality.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

First, look around in the fourm for UPS batteries and you will find a lot of information. When you connect two batteries in parallel or series they need to be of the same amperage. If you had the two connected in parallel then the UPS will only charge uptill 60 amp battery and then it will stop charging. Your 65 amp battery will remain at 60 and this is not good for a battery. Battery needs to be fully charged otherwise the plates get damaged.

[/quote]

Not entirely accurate. One can use differing capacities in parallel so long as the required voltage level is there. It will slow down charging dependent upon the highest capacity parallel combination used but it would charge fine. There are other factors to consider too.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
The built in charger will not be able to charge a 200 amp/hr battery properly.
[/quote]

The charger can charge the higher capacity battery fine but due to load shedding, there is not enough time for the charger to complete charging of battery.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

technically speaking, a normal battery requires an amount of current of 20 amp max to charge and the amount of time required is totally dependent over the usage of it. for instance and batt of 100 amp/hr would require half an our to be precise for recharging. anyhow, i would like you to have your ups checked by your vendor as it might have some problems of over charging, the circuit that cuts off charging can also malfunction due to the heavy ampere load…

[/quote]

The optimal charging current depends on the battery capacity. Usually, C/10 rating should be used for slow charge but that is not practical in the load shedding environment of Pakistan. Hence, higher charge rates are used but that does have adverse effects on the battery life regardless of brand of battery.

I am surprised battery manufacturers experimenting with new battery technologies haven’t though of using Pakistan as a wide scale test bed for testing performance of their new battery technologies in rigorous usage environment.

i recommend dry batteries...

^^ No one wants to label himsef failure. :D

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Not entirely accurate. One can use differing capacities in parallel so long as the required voltage level is there. It will slow down charging dependent upon the highest capacity parallel combination used but it would charge fine. There are other factors to consider too.

[/quote]

If you have an expensive good quality charger like the ones sold in US and are sold for around $100, then you are fine with using two batteries of different AH. However the UPS’s sold in Pakistan have cheap quality chargers built-in them to keep the overall cost of UPS within the reach of general public and these chargers use crude methods like sensing the resistance encountered during charging phase to switch from high charge rate to the trickle charge rate. So, when the smaller AH battery is approx 95% charged, the charger encountering resistance will switch to trickle charge mode and the bigger AH battery will be left under-charged. Which is not good for the battery.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The charger can charge the higher capacity battery fine but due to load shedding, there is not enough time for the charger to complete charging of battery.

[/quote]

Again it will be true if you use an expensive good quality charger. However most of those available in Pakistan use cheap components to sense the feedback resistance to switch over from high charge rate to trickle charge rate and as the resistance of the battery increases with the AH probably due to larger plates or more number of plates etc, so this will most likely cause undue stress on the charger and it might fail in the long run.

This is the reason that Homage 600 W manual mentions a battery of upto 160 AH can be used with the UPS.

Another UPS being sold in Metro Islamabad called Aurora lists the max battery as 140 AH.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I am surprised battery manufacturers experimenting with new battery technologies haven’t though of using Pakistan as a wide scale test bed for testing performance of their new battery technologies in rigorous usage environment.

[/quote]

This is because they do not need to. As gov imposes very high duty on imported batteries, under pressure from bigwigs in domestic market, which makes them well out of reach for the majority of Pakistanis, so the local manufacturers do not need to improve the quality of their batteries in order to maintain their market share or to experiment with newer technologies. They know that most people will be forced to buy their batteries regardless of the quality. This is the reason why no one has introduced a true deep cycle battery for use with UPS. They want people to use starting batteries with UPS and replace batteries after 1-2 years, as these batteries will most likely fail after repeated deep cycles.

A o A

I searched alote on the batteries and at the end i found that the # 1 battery of pakistan is AGS.

The suitable battery for your 600W UPS is 140 to 150 AH.

And if you want to buy a mentanace free battery then homeage (125 AH) is best one according to its price and quality.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

First, look around in the fourm for UPS batteries and you will find a lot of information. When you connect two batteries in parallel or series they need to be of the same amperage. If you had the two connected in parallel then the UPS will only charge uptill 60 amp battery and then it will stop charging. Your 65 amp battery will remain at 60 and this is not good for a battery. Battery needs to be fully charged otherwise the plates get damaged.

[/quote]

Not entirely accurate. One can use differing capacities in parallel so long as the required voltage level is there. It will slow down charging dependent upon the highest capacity parallel combination used but it would charge fine. There are other factors to consider too.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
The built in charger will not be able to charge a 200 amp/hr battery properly.
[/quote]

The charger can charge the higher capacity battery fine but due to load shedding, there is not enough time for the charger to complete charging of battery.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

technically speaking, a normal battery requires an amount of current of 20 amp max to charge and the amount of time required is totally dependent over the usage of it. for instance and batt of 100 amp/hr would require half an our to be precise for recharging. anyhow, i would like you to have your ups checked by your vendor as it might have some problems of over charging, the circuit that cuts off charging can also malfunction due to the heavy ampere load…

[/quote]

The optimal charging current depends on the battery capacity. Usually, C/10 rating should be used for slow charge but that is not practical in the load shedding environment of Pakistan. Hence, higher charge rates are used but that does have adverse effects on the battery life regardless of brand of battery.

I am surprised battery manufacturers experimenting with new battery technologies haven’t though of using Pakistan as a wide scale test bed for testing performance of their new battery technologies in rigorous usage environment.

i recommend dry batteries...

^^ No one wants to label himsef failure. :D

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Not entirely accurate. One can use differing capacities in parallel so long as the required voltage level is there. It will slow down charging dependent upon the highest capacity parallel combination used but it would charge fine. There are other factors to consider too.

[/quote]

If you have an expensive good quality charger like the ones sold in US and are sold for around $100, then you are fine with using two batteries of different AH. However the UPS’s sold in Pakistan have cheap quality chargers built-in them to keep the overall cost of UPS within the reach of general public and these chargers use crude methods like sensing the resistance encountered during charging phase to switch from high charge rate to the trickle charge rate. So, when the smaller AH battery is approx 95% charged, the charger encountering resistance will switch to trickle charge mode and the bigger AH battery will be left under-charged. Which is not good for the battery.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The charger can charge the higher capacity battery fine but due to load shedding, there is not enough time for the charger to complete charging of battery.

[/quote]

Again it will be true if you use an expensive good quality charger. However most of those available in Pakistan use cheap components to sense the feedback resistance to switch over from high charge rate to trickle charge rate and as the resistance of the battery increases with the AH probably due to larger plates or more number of plates etc, so this will most likely cause undue stress on the charger and it might fail in the long run.

This is the reason that Homage 600 W manual mentions a battery of upto 160 AH can be used with the UPS.

Another UPS being sold in Metro Islamabad called Aurora lists the max battery as 140 AH.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I am surprised battery manufacturers experimenting with new battery technologies haven’t though of using Pakistan as a wide scale test bed for testing performance of their new battery technologies in rigorous usage environment.

[/quote]

This is because they do not need to. As gov imposes very high duty on imported batteries, under pressure from bigwigs in domestic market, which makes them well out of reach for the majority of Pakistanis, so the local manufacturers do not need to improve the quality of their batteries in order to maintain their market share or to experiment with newer technologies. They know that most people will be forced to buy their batteries regardless of the quality. This is the reason why no one has introduced a true deep cycle battery for use with UPS. They want people to use starting batteries with UPS and replace batteries after 1-2 years, as these batteries will most likely fail after repeated deep cycles.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

This is because they do not need to. As gov imposes very high duty on imported batteries, under pressure from bigwigs in domestic market, which makes them well out of reach for the majority of Pakistanis, so the local manufacturers do not need to improve the quality of their batteries in order to maintain their market share or to experiment with newer technologies. They know that most people will be forced to buy their batteries regardless of the quality. This is the reason why no one has introduced a true deep cycle battery for use with UPS. They want people to use starting batteries with UPS and replace batteries after 1-2 years, as these batteries will most likely fail after repeated deep cycles.

[/quote]

+1 … True