Homage Inverter Question

about two months ago i purchased Homage vision 1000 and volta N190 185 amp battery .but it is giving much less back up time maximum 40 minutes and average 20 minutes.

my load is 4 fans and 3 energy savers

can anybody suggest a solution to increase back up time

Calculate the Power Consumption! of your Whole Output then find the amperes! I think there is some difference between the consumption

please tell me how to calculate

I am using homage 1000 inverter. The issue is inverter exhaust fan start during the charge mode but it does not run on backup mode (when there is no light). Because of this the inverter gets really hot specailly the upper side.

Normally we run 2 fan and 2-3 savers not more then that.

Looking for your help on this.

Regards, Mazhar

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about two months ago i purchased Homage vision 1000 and volta N190 185 amp battery .but it is giving much less back up time maximum 40 minutes and average 20 minutes.

my load is 4 fans and 3 energy savers

can anybody suggest a solution to increase back up time

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how old are your fans ? normally new fans take nearly 80 watts and as it gets old it goes upto 200 + watts so either there is some problem with fans or the battery

fans are 20 plus years old but if there was over load than homage inverter gives warning.And when all fans are running than load status on inverter lcd is 3 bars which is about 75%

i have a inverter of 1000 VA homage can some one tell me which size of battery should be suitable for 4 fans and 5 energy saver for maximum 3 hrs back up time plzzz

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i have a inverter of 1000 VA homage can some one tell me which size of battery should be suitable for 4 fans and 5 energy saver for maximum 3 hrs back up time plzzz
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Calculate using this calculator http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long

Check ur ups n battery frm sm electrition

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please tell me how to calculate
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OK here is how u calculate your power consumption and supply :

Consumption:

4 Fans(80 W) = 4 x 80 = 320 W

3 Energy Saver(11 W) = 3 x 11 = 33 W

Total Load = 320 + 33 = 353 W

Supply:

Watt-Hour Capacity = 185 Ah x 12 V = 2220 Wh

Number of Hours Battery could run the Load:

Hours = 2220 Wh / 353 W = ~ 6 Hrs.

Comments:

- If your battery really is 185 Ah then there is something wrong either with your UPS or battery or load b/c according to above calculations it should run your load for around 6 hrs.

- I assumed you use small energy savers that are 11 W. Even if u use big ones that consume 24 W still wont make that much of a difference.

- Load / Battery losses are not taken into account but again approximate running time should be around 6 hrs.

- Check out that N190 really is 185 Ah ?

I have checked out N190's specifications on volta.com.pk and if I am not wrong its capacity mentioned on the site is 108 Ah.

BUT even with 108 Ah capacity, it should be able to run your load for around 3 and a half hours. ( Can check this by redoing the calculations in my last post and changing 185 Ah to 108 Ah )

lets do some maths

3rd load bar represents the load is greater than 50% and less than equal to 75% (>50 & <= 75)

50% of 600w = 300w

75% of 600w = 450w

so it means ur load power consumption is in between 300w to 450w right

lets assume u r using a new 185AH battery

with 300w load u will get approximately 185min or 3.08hours backup time

with 450w load u will get approximately 123.3min or 2.05hours backup time

with 3th load bar u can get a backup time of 2 to 3 hours with 185AH battery (depending on ur battery condition)

if in case u r not geting backup time in between 2 to 3 hours it means ur Battery is Faulty & u need to replace it,

make sure there is hell of difference between Automotive & UPS battery,

@ Hassanahmed

Number of Hours Battery could run the Load:

Hours = 2220 Wh / 353 W = ~ 6 Hrs its wrong plz check ur calculations

Regards

Engr Asad Hameed

hameeds01@yahoo.com

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

lets do some maths

3rd load bar represents the load is greater than 50% and less than equal to 75% (>50 & <= 75)

50% of 600w = 300w

75% of 600w = 450w

so it means ur load power consumption is in between 300w to 450w right

lets assume u r using a new 185AH battery

with 300w load u will get approximately 185min or 3.08hours backup time

with 450w load u will get approximately 123.3min or 2.05hours backup time

with 3th load bar u can get a backup time of 2 to 3 hours with 185AH battery (depending on ur battery condition)

if in case u r not geting backup time in between 2 to 3 hours it means ur Battery is Faulty & u need to replace it,

make sure there is hell of difference between Automotive & UPS battery,

@ Hassanahmed

Number of Hours Battery could run the Load:

Hours = 2220 Wh / 353 W = ~ 6 Hrs its wrong plz check ur calculations

Regards

Engr Asad Hameed

hameeds01@yahoo.com

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Dear Hameed,

I used the standard calculation methods for Load Evaluation (book method). + as I mentioned in my post that the calculations are for IDEAL condition i.e, no battery loss , no load loss and depth of battery cycle being 100%, which is not the case in real life.

In short my calculations were for ideal conditions.

I am very curious about clearing my concepts related to this science, and would really appreciate if you could kindly give reference or details how you calculated the load.

For example u mentioned with 300w load u will get approximately 185min or 3.08hours backup time . By what formula or tables you deduced that? Also you mentioned 3rd Load Bar . what is it and in what case we use this condition ( 50% < x <75% ) and how ?

The calculations I used are what I learned from textbooks or web-tutorials etc.

I also want to ask that in our Residential Batteries it is mentioned that they are Deep Cycle, But it is NOT mentioned How Deep?. According to my knowledge there is a particular measure / specification for the depth of the cycle. That measure is DOD(Depth of Discharge) and is supposed to be b/w 50% - 80%.

I am aware that thr are differences in what is written in the books and the actual practices. Actual practices involves more Rules of Thumb rather than long accurate formulae. Can u please help me in that side as I am willing to clear my concepts in this science.

Thank you for your assistance :D

A curious fellow

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For example u mentioned with 300w load u will get approximately 185min or 3.08hours backup time . By what formula or tables you deduced that?
[/quote]

http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long

if u need further derivations i can provide u

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
Also you mentioned 3rd Load Bar . what is it and in what case we use this condition ( 50% < x <75% ) and how ?
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I’m talking about New model of Homage UPS LCD version in which there is a Load indication with 4 bars

Bar1 ==> 1% to 25% Load

Bar2 ==> 26% to 50% Load

Bar3 ==> 50% to 75% Load

Bar4 ==> 76% to 100% Load

Regards

Engr Asad Hameed

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long

if u need further derivations i can provide u

Regards

Engr Asad Hameed

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OK I ran a few tests on http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long calculator. I was curious HOW can a calculator tell you battery backup time without asking for DOD (depth of discharge) and System/Inverter Efficiency. I found out the following things :

  • The calculator assumes DOD (how deep battery cycle is) to be 60%.

    - The calculator also ASSUMES System/Inverter Efficiency is 70%.


    With the above mentioned Calculator’s assumptions My book-formulas will give EXACTLY the same values as yours. BUT what if your battery is actually 80% or 50% Deep cycle, then you will be either under-estimating or over-estimating your batteries. Also in case of inverters because there are some inverters with even 95% efficiency then you will be highly under-estimating your system and hence spending for something MORE than u require.

    And also you didnt reply to query in my last post regarding Depth of Discharge <---- very important factor

    [quote=", post:, topic:"]

    I also want to ask that in our Residential Batteries it is mentioned that they are Deep Cycle, But it is NOT mentioned How Deep?. According to my knowledge there is a particular measure / specification for the depth of the cycle. That measure is DOD(Depth of Discharge) and is supposed to be b/w 50% - 80%.

    [/quote]

Oh and I forgot: Thank You very much for your replies and assistance, im grateful :D