Higher the Tempature = Less Energry Consumption? (A/C Split)


#1

Is that true that Higher the temperature I put A/C on, the lesser it consumes energy? I want to confirm this since I've heard that a lot of times.


#2

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Is that true that Higher the temperature I put A/C on, the lesser it consumes energy? I want to confirm this since I’ve heard that a lot of times.
[/quote]

the higher temperature u put the AC on the less it will cool meaning less energy consumption so i think what u heard is correct


#3

Lets confirm it from more members so we can come to a conclusion. :)


#4

First off, your question is a bit ambiguous. When you say 'higher temperature', do you mean higher temperature of the room? Say set the thermostat to maintain the room at 25 degrees (higher) instead of 20 degrees (lower)?

If yes, then its pretty obvious that it will consume less energy since it'll have to 'cool' less. Its the cooling cycle of the air-conditioner which consumes the greater part of electricity. While its in fan mode, its really just like any other room fan, and won't take that much juice to run.


#5

The main energy consuming component of your air conditioner is the compressor. When the compressor runs (this is when you get the humming sound) thats when the ac is actively "cooling"

The lower your target temperature is, the longer the compressor has to stay on and keep cooling the "rods" over which the inside unit, the blower, moves air over. If the ambient room of the temperature is 26* and your AC is set at 27* it should just simply work as a fan. If the ambient room of the temperature is 28* and your AC is set at 27*, then the compressor will remain on and actively cool the room till it reaches 27* and then power off. When the temperature again rises above the threshold, the compressor comes on.

Of particular note is the fact that bringing the temperature down in the room, requires exponentially more power with every degree of change in the ambient temperature i.e. such that it requires a lot more compressor usage to bring the temperature down to 24 from 27 than it it does to 25 or 26.

Generally, the most efficient temperature range is around 24-25*.

Hope this helps.


#6

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

The main energy consuming component of your air conditioner is the compressor. When the compressor runs (this is when you get the humming sound) thats when the ac is actively "cooling"

The lower your target temperature is, the longer the compressor has to stay on and keep cooling the “rods” over which the inside unit, the blower, moves air over. If the ambient room of the temperature is 26* and your AC is set at 27* it should just simply work as a fan. If the ambient room of the temperature is 28* and your AC is set at 27*, then the compressor will remain on and actively cool the room till it reaches 27* and then power off. When the temperature again rises above the threshold, the compressor comes on.

Of particular note is the fact that bringing the temperature down in the room, requires exponentially more power with every degree of change in the ambient temperature i.e. such that it requires a lot more compressor usage to bring the temperature down to 24 from 27 than it it does to 25 or 26.

Generally, the most efficient temperature range is around 24-25*.

Hope this helps.

[/quote]

Thank you for the information.