Explain me hd stuff

most of the 720p videos that i download are 1280*544 or 1280*576 or something like that... even for big sized 8gb videos i don't get 1280*720p... there are some that i have downloaded are 1280*720p but mostly they are not... then there are 1080p videos... all of them are like 1920*800 but i have only found two movies which are in real 1920*1080 ... can someone tell me the difference or is it just due to the black bars or whatever?? i need to know....

Let me guess, you downloaded movies that are already converted/encoded to Divx or Xvid? If so then conversion software usually crop or resize picture size to reduce resultant file size. You might notice that even audio quality is also considerable reduced.

Try to purchase original Bluray disc, not copied material, but original Hollywood disc to get HD video with superb audio :)

^Yay Pay Up

Aspect Ratio and Resolution

Aspect ratio isn't just "widescreen" and "standard." Where TVs are basically two different sizes, computer screens have been hopelessly convoluted.

Resolution is the number of pixels (the individual dots that make up the picture) wide the screen is and the number of pixels tall the screen is, and we can get the aspect ratio from this. For example, the average 15" flat-panel screen is 1024x768. That means the picture is 1,024 pixels wide and 768 pixels tall. This screen has an aspect ratio of 4:3. That means that for every four pixels there are horizontally, there are three pixels vertically.

Your home television and most desktop computer screens are built 4:3.

Now, of course, this is all great, but notebook manufacturers often don't tell you the screens aspect ratio and seldom list resolution. They usually just say "WUXGA" or something similar. Here's a guide that tells you exactly what each of those abbreviations really means. I've *'ed the odd ones out and will explain them in detail after the chart.

"Standard" Screens

Abbreviation / Resolution / Aspect Ratio

•XGA / 1024x768 / 4:3

•SXGA / 1280x1024 / 5:4*

•SXGA+ / 1400x1050 / 4:3

•UXGA / 1600x1200 / 4:3

"Widescreen" Screens

Abbreviation / Resolution / Aspect Ratio

•WXGA / 1280x768 / 5:3**

•WXGA / 1280x800 / 8:5 (16:10)***

•WXGA+ / 1440x900 / 8:5 (16:10)***

•WSXGA+ / 1680x1050 / 8:5 (16:10)***

•WUXGA / 1920x1200 / 8:5 (16:10)***

Yeah, you can see how that could get a little confusing!

SXGA resolution (1280x1024) is sort of anomalous. For some odd reason, it became very popular, but the aspect ratio is off. The actual proper step up in resolution to maintain the 4:3 ratio is 1280x960, but it's fairly uncommon for people to run screens at that resolution, and notebook screens almost never appear with it.

The widescreen resolutions are a real chore. They're usually cited as 16:10 to bring them in line with the 16:9 that the home theatre enthusiast is familiar with, but true 16:9 would be 1280x720, and that's a pretty odd resolution. So your DVDs are STILL going to get letterboxed, but it'll be much more negligible.

Also, one major pain is that ultraportable notebooks will sometimes use a resolution of 1280x768 instead of 1280x800, and that's even weirder. (But it sure looks nice on that tiny screen.)

Note that any of these screens can scale down in resolution. Because notebook screens have a fixed number of pixels (while desktop CRT monitors do not), pixels are essentially "blended" to achieve the intended resolution. In older screens this tended to look pretty awful, but newer ones blend very well and produce a fairly good picture. Still, it won't look as good as the screen's native resolution. The reason that I mention any of this is because I've seen people ask if their screen can run at a lower resolution, and yes, it can. But you probably won't want to.

Gamers will actually probably want to stick to lower resolution screens so the games can run at native resolution, while multimedia enthusiasts (digital image manipulation, video editing) will want to get as high a resolution as they can.

Screen Size

So now you have the fundamentals for understanding how many pixels are on the screen, but what about the screen size?

When a manufacturer lists a screen size in inches, it measures that distance from the bottom left corner to the top right corner. So if a screen size is listed as 15.4", it's 15.4" from the bottom left corner to the top right corner.

Below is a list of the typical screen sizes you can expect to find and the resolutions they routinely appear with. Note that the first one in each list will be by far the most common one.

Standard Screen Sizes and Typical Resolutions:

•14" - XGA

•15" - XGA, SXGA+

Widescreen Screen Sizes and Typical Resolutions:

•10.6" - WXGA (1280x768)

•12.1" - WXGA (1280x800)

•13.3" - WXGA (1280x800)

•14.1" - WXGA (1280x800)

•15.4" - WXGA (1280x800), WXGA+, WSXGA+

•17" - WXGA, WXGA+, WSXGA+, WUXGA

14.1" seems to be the sweet spot for travel-ready notebooks, while 15.4" is more for notebooks geared for desktop replacement, and 17" is almost strictly desktop replacement. The lower sizes are for ultraportables and thin and lights.

this article might be helpful for u!!!!!

In an nutsehell these are resolutions and it depends on how much your screen supports!!!!

=D

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Let me guess, you downloaded movies that are already converted/encoded to Divx or Xvid? If so then conversion software usually crop or resize picture size to reduce resultant file size. You might notice that even audio quality is also considerable reduced.

Try to purchase original Bluray disc, not copied material, but original Hollywood disc to get HD video with superb audio :)

[/quote]

the .mkv releases are exactly the same quality as Blue Ray disks. they are not RIPS. the reason why they dont have 720 lines of vertical resolution is to compensate for the incredibly wide cinematic aspect ratio

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

most of the 720p videos that i download are 1280544 or 1280576 or something like that… even for big sized 8gb videos i don’t get 1280720p… there are some that i have downloaded are 1280720p but mostly they are not… then there are 1080p videos… all of them are like 1920800 but i have only found two movies which are in real 19201080 … can someone tell me the difference or is it just due to the black bars or whatever?? i need to know…
[/quote]

your question aside let me ask you this what display unit you use to view 1920*1080 content and at what resolution. thanks.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

your question aside let me ask you this what display unit you use to view 19201080 content and at what resolution. thanks.

[/quote]

i didn’t get what you mean by display unit?? you talking about monitor?? i have a dell 21" crt at 150hz… i really haven’t been successful in downloading any 19201080 movie yet… due to slow ptcl speeds(yes even on 2mb) i have to go for private trackers… who ban me quite often due to low share ratio… i am currently trying to download a two genuine 1080p movies they are dark night and resident evil(2002)…

Almost all HDTV has 16:9 aspect ratio, whereas movies shot for cinemas are usually much wider 2.24:1, 2.35:1 . Since most people prefer to watch movies in their original aspect ratio, this leaves bars at top and bottom of wide screen TVs. 720p means that video will have horizontal resolution = 1280 and maximum vertical resolution = 720, 1080p means that video will have horizontal resolution = 1920 and maximum vertical res = 1080.

720p would be enough for 21inch CRT screen unless you sit very close to monitor. Remember to set your monitor's resolution equal or higher than video resolution (1920x1280 (if WS) or 1920x1440 (if FS)).

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

’]Almost all HDTV has 16:9 aspect ratio, whereas movies shot for cinemas are usually much wider 2.24:1, 2.35:1 . Since most people prefer to watch movies in their original aspect ratio, this leaves bars at top and bottom of wide screen TVs. 720p means that video will have horizontal resolution = 1280 and maximum vertical resolution = 720, 1080p means that video will have horizontal resolution = 1920 and maximum vertical res = 1080.

720p would be enough for 21inch CRT screen unless you sit very close to monitor. Remember to set your monitor’s resolution equal or higher than video resolution (1920x1280 (if WS) or 1920x1440 (if FS)).

[/quote]

oh man do you really need to set an equal or higher resolution?? screen size changes and then i will have to change the edges all the time… i could get hectic

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

oh man do you really need to set an equal or higher resolution?? screen size changes and then i will have to change the edges all the time… i could get hectic

[/quote]

well if your monitor res is less than the HD video, then whats the point of HD video?

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

well if your monitor res is less than the HD video, then whats the point of HD video?

[/quote]

doesn’t the video has its seperate resolution?? irrespective of the desktop res. just like in games??

^ the resolution of your monitor has to be equal to or greater than the resolution of the video else the video wont fit your monitor and you will be essentially downscaling the video which makes for a lose in quality

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

doesn’t the video has its seperate resolution?? irrespective of the desktop res. just like in games??

[/quote]

yes but if your monitor has, lets say, 50,000 pixels, and the video has 100,000 pixels. the monitor is going to have to force the video into showing 50,000 pixels and thus reducing its quality. if its vice versa, and the monitor has 100,000 pixels and video with 50,000 , then the video will play with the quality it was meant to be.

well you are right man... i just tried mystic river(1280*720exact) at 800*600,1024*768,1280*720,1920*1280.... and at 800*600 it was pathetic... 1024*768 was okay... 1280*720 was actually a stretched resolution but the quality was a lot lot better than the previous two.... but hell man i will have to adjust screen size everytime:(....

Some CRTs remember size of screen, you just have to change resolution and they will automatically adjust your screen size (you will have to change size only first time for each resolution).

You can use 1280x960 and picture won't be stretched anymore.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

’]Some CRTs remember size of screen, you just have to change resolution and they will automatically adjust your screen size (you will have to change size only first time for each resolution).

You can use 1280x960 and picture won’t be stretched anymore.

[/quote]

yup they save it… you are right… the only problem is the 60hz at the max. res. of 2048*1536 of my monitor… but at slightly lower i can go upto 85hz which is less painful to my eyes… 60hz= /slitwrists