Difference between access point & router?

Guys can anybody explain me the difference between access point & router?

Again, have you heard of Wikipedia?

"In computer networking, a wireless access point (WAP or AP) is a device that allows wireless communication devices to connect to a wireless network using Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or related standards. "

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Access_point

Hence a wireless access point and a wireless router are the same.

No man both are not at all are same!

There IS a difference thats y I started this thread!!

According to: http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/1586861

The main thing to remember is that access points allow wireless clients access to a single network, while WLAN routers allow clients to browse a number of different networks. The router always takes the IP address into account to make decisions on how to forward (i.e., route) the packet; whereas, access points generally ignore the IP address and forward all packets.

In addition, WLAN routers implement the Network Address Translation (NAT) protocol that enables multiple network devices to share a single IP address generally provided by the Internet Service provider (ISP). WLAN routers also have the ability to provide port-based control, firewall management and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) services for all devices. These functions make the WLAN router much more versatile than an access point.

Well they essentially perform the same function. Now you're just arguing semantics! If there is only one person connected to a router, then there is only one network available through that router, and hence it becomes an 'access point'!

Routers and access points are different

its like a wifi access point is just like a wireless switch, while a wifi router, performs many other functions too, it has servers like DHCP and DNS server, and provides services such NAT, dynamic routing etc.

(over simplified explanation)

access point is access point

router is router

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access point is access point

router is router

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Very simple and easy to understand explanation… :P

@TokyoDrift

What sah described is technically correct.

However, I know that you are looking for "local computer market's" definition. According to that:

Access Point (AP): A wireless device that connect to other computers and create a wireless network (LAN).

Router (first definition): A DSL router that allow your computer to use DSL internet.

Router (second definition): It's actually called "network switch" but in local markets it is also called router (which is technically correct). It's a wired device that connect to other wired computers and create a wired network (LAN).

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Don't use local markets terms so often, because most of them are wrong or not valid. For years (still now) local market shopkeepers/salesmen used the term "digital monitor" for analog CRT monitors, even though device does not have DVI connector. Just because instead of nobs, it has buttons and it display settings overlaying on display will not make it "digital monitor". I had tried in vain correcting people but they are so thick to understand terms.

Access point is for connecting within a network.

Router is for connecting across networks.

Consider a scenario: You want to extend range of your wireless network in a large hall. You will use a wireless router for performing routing services (plus dhcp, filtering, etc as required). Your internet link will terminate in this router (as WAN) and it will hence also be called a gateway. This connects your network comprising of computers in the hall to the internet.

You will use an access point somewhere in the middle of the hall. It will connect users/computers to your network inside the hall but it will also extend your range to the entire hall (depends on the size of the hall).

If a laptop user sitting at the end of the hall wants to access the internet, his laptop will first connect wirelessly to the access point in the "hall network". That will put him in contact with the gateway/router which will route his internet bound requests to the internet (external network). Also, if the user want to send a file to someone else using a wireless device inside the same hall, his request/data will be forwarded by the access point to the router which will route his "hall network" requests to the other user in the hall.

To use another anology, consider a railway track. The router is the "kaanta" which decides which track you want the train (data packet in our case) to go on. The access point is the "patree" which carries the train far away.

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Access point is for connecting within a network.

Router is for connecting across networks.

[/quote]

Yes, this is the actual difference between the two.

APs r used within ur LAN connections whereas routers are the devices that r used to connect different networks and r used on WAN connections.

nice explanation asad....

A router can serve like a traffic cop. It allows you to share a single internet connection among multiple users much like a traffic cop manages multiple motorists on a single road. A router supports Network Address Translation. This method allows multiple computers to share one public ipv4 address. The router modifies packet headers so that data goes to the correct computer.

This discussion reminds me of my philosophy classes back in 2000.

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This discussion reminds me of my philosophy classes back in 2000.
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No philosophy here. There is a clear difference between a router an and access point. I have explained router above so I will explain what an access point is. Basically an access point allows you to connect to a wireless network. It does not perform Network Address Translation. It does not allow you to share a single internet connection. All it does is provide connectivity between different computers in the same network. So basically a router is a much smarter device than an access point.

Each device has its uses. If you want to simply create a home network then you would by an access point (wireless network) or a switch (if its a wired network). If you want to share an internet connection then you need a router.

Hey! of course, I have understood the difference between the two. The way, things have been put here by asad and you, it's become easy for a person like me to get the meaning. What takes me back in time is the different analogies given above.

Investing in a router is better because a wireless router can work as an access point as well, but an access point will not provide the functionality of the router.

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According to: http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/1586861
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Exactly.

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Again, have you heard of Wikipedia?

"In computer networking, a wireless access point (WAP or AP) is a device that allows wireless communication devices to connect to a wireless network using Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or related standards. "

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Access_point

Hence a wireless access point and a wireless router are the same.

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Friends,

This Definition is rite for AP’s.

Routers are for routing there work is to route traffic between different Networks.

NAT is Network Address Translation helps improve security by reusing IP addresses. The NAT router translates traffic coming into and leaving the private network. You can read more about NAT from http://computer.howstuffworks.com/nat.htm .

Well AP+NATRouter = Wifi router or AP Router like from TPLINK , linkSys and etc etc.

Simple AP’s are to use to extend the wireless network range with same WAP or WPE Key. But you need a Router in the end to serve the DHCP Service and NAT routing Services to share Wan Connect and WAN Connection could be cable , DSL , or Evdo and even Dialup Internet Connect.

So a wifi DSL Routers are Basically are the Combination of DSL Modem + NATing Router + AP.

Hope you Guys can Under stand

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