Ceiling fan falling down


#1

Almost all of us use ceiling fans. Although there are very few incidents reported where the fan has fallen down causing injury or damage but still the threat is there. What additional precautions we should take so that the threat of falling is ultimately over. Also please let me know if the threat of falling is more in running condition or stopped condition. what about the weight of the fan in running condition as compared to stopped condition?. What about vibrating celing fans ? Any other aspect. Please share ...


#2

I haven't heard of a ceiling fan falling down but the thought of it falling on me and injuring me often crosses my mind when lying on bed and staring at fan idly. :unsure:


#3

I saw one fall intfront me eyes when offering jumma prayer in mosque.

As far as i know Ceiling fans only fall when the hook onto which they are hung are just attached to the ceiling with drilled screws. Which with the passage of time, screws get loose due to the vibration of fan and then TADA! it is on you head. Specter's dream come true :) The proper way to hang the ceiling fan is to place the Hook with large base when the concrete is being laid on roof, during the construction of roof.

Other scenario may be that the Fan may fall into pieces, which is 99% not going to happen.


#4

1) The round rubber wheel at the ceiling hook should be in good condition.

2) Always use a nut+bolt which has hole for a cotter pin and always use the pin

3) If you can not find a bolt with the cotter pin option, always use double nut (AKA Check Nut)

4) Make sure the fins/wings are straight and fan does not vibrate when running. A vibrating fan is more likely to fall down.


#5

But I've seen fans moving sideways wildly while running. Being under such a fan is pretty risky, though their owners don't seem to care much :/


#6

@ahmsun next time I'll dream of it crashing on you :P


#7

[quote=“Specter, post:5, topic:14547”]

But I’ve seen fans moving sideways wildly while running. Being under such a fan is pretty risky, though their owners don’t seem to care much :confused:

[/quote]

True - I have seen this accident right at my home where a ceiling fan fell down on my brother, he was lucky to survive the injuries.

Basically ceiling fan has three points from where the joint can open.

1) The main motor - Capacitor container drum, this is a screw joint and must have cotter pin.

2) Capacitor container drum - Pipe rod, also a screw joint and must have cotter pin.

3) Pipe Rod - Mounting hook (U shaped) - also a screw joint and must have cotter pin.

Finally you use a rubber roller + Nut/Bolt, here you should use cotter pin or double nut.

Any joint can open up and 99.9% possibility is that a running fan will fall down increasing the chances of severe injury especially to kids.


#8

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#9

I have heard couple of falling fan incidents during operation injuring people. However, I had strange experience of seeing my fan (the best brand with date tree) on fire. Two weeks ago I woke up due to heat and choking smoke of burning plastic in my room. I was surprised to see the lower cup of fan on fire which gave us tough time to extinguish. Later it was discovered that the capacitor had burst igniting fire. :(


#10

Use pedaster fans instead of cieling. That's best solution :P


#11

The vibration can increase due to usage of extra length of rod between mounting hook and fan.


#12

During installation of new fan, when rod is screwed with fan drum having capacitor, must use a cotter pin. This eliminates the risk of falling. If you don't use the cotter and tight the rod and then tight the screw, there is 100% chance of its falling.


#13

Thanks for providing so much valuable inputs. Running fan also produces a slight downward thrust (like helicopter) so if running fan falls, its impact may be reduced due to that thrust. On the other hand, a fan in stopped condition may fall with greater impact. Its just my opinion which may be wrong.


#14

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#15

the rod going into my ceiling where my fan hung had gotten loose and my ceiling fan was starting to swing too much from side to side. I had to take it down and i am using pak louvre plastic pedestal fans now mounted on walls.

basically it was too much hassle for me too call up a guy to dig into the cement and put in the rod again and fix it with cement.

The pedestal fans mounted on side wall now are doing fine. if they fall, they r plastic, light weight and can do little damage, and the threat of injury is even far less as they are side wall mounted fan and i dont sleep directly under them.


#16

[quote=", post:4, topic:14547"]

1) The round rubber wheel at the ceiling hook should be in good condition.

2) Always use a nut+bolt which has hole for a cotter pin and always use the pin

3) If you can not find a bolt with the cotter pin option, always use double nut (AKA Check Nut)

4) Make sure the fins/wings are straight and fan does not vibrate when running. A vibrating fan is more likely to fall down.

[/quote]

exactly & never trust your electrician ;) (99% are just plain dumb.


#17

The way I see it, most of them just hang there with a single nut and bolt. And yes, swinging makes it risky with the possibility of nut or bolt going off.


#18

First off: Use proper hooks, like one Ahmsun mentioned above..

Second: Dont mess with the blades, if you try to change its angle or shape then it might run wildly

Third: Fan falling down is ultimately your fault or the guy who installed it.


#19

^Absolutely right.

btw who is ahsum?


#20

[quote=“Ahmsun, post:19, topic:14547”]

^Absolutely right.

btw who is ahsum?

[/quote]

I have the faintest idea what you are talking about ;)