Calling all Wind Turbine owners in Pakistan

Anyone working with wind turbines?

Solar is over-sold at least in less tech-savvy Pakistan. The advantages of having a simple static roof top installation are obvious as against a rotating contraption, hanging 50 feet up in the air with dump loads and so forth.

However the wind turbine has an obvious advantage over solar, that of being able to generate power 24 hrs a day as against only about 5-6 hrs by solar. So investment in a windmill can be of a much smaller size, all other things remaining constant.

Is there anyone here who has a wind turbine installed at home or office? Kindly share your experience.

Aurangzeb

In order to capture wind u need a proper tower installation. Its not easily done in a home situation.

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Anyone?

Yes, I have made wind turbine & tested it also but not installed for longer period because of some reasons.

Blades were made from wood. Estimated output power of 300W in maximum wind speed.

Great.

I would appreciate if you could post details/pictures etc. for the benefit of all of us.

Aurangzeb

A bit off topic, but let's make a windmill this big. I was amazed to see the transportation technique.

350vuqv.jpg

^ well... yeah.. lets :D

Lol

On a serious note, I think that 8 to 10 kw prop is doable. I understand that a company in Lahore has developed a 3 meter radius prop made out of fiberglass. That should be good for at least 10 kw peak and about 2-3 kw average.

Any ideas how do we find out which company it is and whether they are marketting it.

Aurangzeb

^ have you have had any cost calculation of the basic equipment? how much does the windmill cost? the turbine/ inverter? and how deep must you dig?

also do you have an acre or more of land space? i seriously doubt you can do any such work with strong foundation on any roof..

PS; i am asking because i am myself interested in the prospect..

Farhan

So what do you think? Its flying on a rooftop.

Image024.jpg

^ is that a mill or a wind compass? :P

JK....how much power does that small sized mill generates?.. in a normal breeze?..let say it rotates at constant angular velocity in a mild breeze for hour ..how much amps/watts would it generate?

The estimated energy harvested from wind by this turbine over a one year period is estimated to be 10K units of electricity. This works out to be about 25 units/day on the average. That averages to one unit/hour. At 230 volts that would mean about 4 amps/hr.

The good thing is that it can be grid tied in its basic configuration. This will reduce the WAPDA bill. However with add ons it will also work when there is no grid power available, and can then charge batteries. With an average of one unit per hour it is more than what is needed for an average domestic consumer. It will run an AC, but in grid tied mode only.

As you can see the photo above, the props are no good. The pic below is the theoretical design of the prop blade. We need a fiberglass person to manufacture it, cost effectively.

3d4.png

^you do realize to effectively generate around that much minimum power you would need 3-4 turbines, and it would work best only as grid tie as this much power couldn't be directly stored to batteries... i m not sure the power is AC or DC and/or would require an inverter in between...and since wind is not a constant force, it will have ups and downs in force,and thus it would either generate too much and wasted energy or too little energy.. since wind should effectively be grid tie, since adding batteries would be additional huge burden requiring a specific wind based charge controller and a lot of complicated wiring for both grid tie and off rid setups from one source, wouldn't that be too much of a hassle?

[quote=“farhan_ds, post:13, topic:20881”]

^you do realize to effectively generate around that much minimum power you would need 3-4 turbines, and it would work best only as grid tie as this much power couldn't be directly stored to batteries... i m not sure the power is AC or DC and/or would require an inverter in between...and since wind is not a constant force, it will have ups and downs in force,and thus it would either generate too much and wasted energy or too little energy.. since wind should effectively be grid tie, since adding batteries would be additional huge burden requiring a specific wind based charge controller and a lot of complicated wiring for both grid tie and off rid setups from one source, wouldn't that be too much of a hassle?

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The design that I have shown you is with a 7.5 KW generator. This is of course fairly high. Yes it would require a lot of batteries to store all that energy. If these batteries are not available then the harvested energy would have to be wasted as heat. It could be used for heating water though which is normally what it is used for. One can of course go for a smaller unit with a 2-3 KW generator to allay this problem. It would be a cheaper also .

The up and down thing you refer to is there. But it is quite like solar in which the up and down is quite gradual. So the same inverters as they have in solar are used here also which have a charge controller for the battery. It is quite similar to a solar setup. The main advantage of course is that it works during the night also. The hassle part is exactly equal to a solar setup- no more no less. EXACTLY the same setup is required. The only hassle is that the windmill is a rotating machine hanging 50+ feet up in the air while solar cells are nice clean static units sitting pretty on the ground/rooftop. But the two distinct advantages are 1. it generates energy 24 hrs. 2. It is much cheaper watt for watt.

Aurangzeb

And in grid tie the system becomes very very simple. The only problem is when there is no WAPDA i.e. off-grid or load shedding. Then you need batteries.

In grid tie its free energy in a very simple system. No inverters needed. :rolleyes:

Aurangzeb

but grid tie would fail in PK because we have no constant wapda. even when we do we dont have constant voltages.. even if we do, the low speed of wind would reduce energy production.. and basically in summers when it is needed the most, the summer noon heat has usually what we call "LOO" and static air.. especially in august to october period with extra humidity.

besides,.. what about winds and tornados.. how can a pole mounted 50 feet on a roof withstand such powerful winds we have in windy seasons, or any other time,.. not to mention an large blade fan rotating in opposition to wind with a huge diameter.. it would just blow away along with extreme damage to roof..no matter how much you try to strengthen it, roof top windmills are a serious hazard to your house and those neighbours behind..

i am not even touching kite flying and basant.. :P

the cheapest per watt electricity is with a grid tie system.. no wiring, no batteries, a simple inverter and BAM...all day free light..only buy panels, and an inverter..

this is what we did for past many years with Goodwe grid tie inverters, as they only made them,..connected to wapda mains it ensured free run through electricity.. the better option was just to connect it to UPS mains out..and thus, UPS kept batteries charged on wapda and all day on float.. and the rest of the out put was tied in with solar. that was bevcause almost every one in PK has UPS already..worked best wth APC charging..

Solar is a simpler solution here in PK because we have 8 months of sunlight fully, and even more these years..wind is not a reliable continuous source..and storage requires extra costly and technical measures.

and that is why wind would be best a grid tie solution only..adding batteries CC and inverters would increase the cost of setup already too high with special fabrication processes and lack of expert engineering..

Good news.

My "CHIRRIA" tells me that 'Net Metering' is under active consideration.

Position yourselves please.

Aurangzeb

ow that is great news.. Finally our stock of grid tie inverters will be able to Rise Above Hate..>!!!

I did a wind turbine project back in School days. The problem with wind turbine is they need "Wind Cut in speed"

[quote=", post:, topic:"]
Cut-in speed.
At very low wind speeds, there is insufficient torque exerted by the wind on the turbine blades to make them rotate. However, as the speed increases, the wind turbine will begin to rotate and generate electrical power. The speed at which the turbine first starts to rotate and generate power is called the cut-in speed and is typically between 3 and 4 metres per second.

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In areas like lahore we don't have such speeds available. In lahore we need airborne wind turbine e.g

AltaerosEnergies-1395767838956.jpg \\

http://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/renewables/first-commercial-floating-wind-turbine-hovers-above-alaska

Actually what I designed was also a airborne turbine.