Battery for UPS


#1

I need a battery for UPS and want to know that which one is best for long backup time should i go for dry battery plz help me


#2

Wet: Cheaper, shorter life, requires periodic maintenance.

Dry: Expensive, long life, no periodic maintenance required.


#3

The another serious issue is neurotoxic gases release by wet battery when charging. If placed in confined place (a normal room with closed windows) it can concentrate these gases and inhaling them... well you get the picture.


#4

which dry battery is best for me I have 750 watt UPS chinese


#5

Asalam O Alaikum all

Could anyone tell me from where i can find Genuine APC UPS ES-650VA (not made in china) in karachi and what about its price. Also does anyone know about Deutsche power UPS(made in germany).

Saad saleem

Karachi


#6

Talking about batteries,

I got an AGS battery with my ~800watt local UPS.

Experienced and really really wise friends like Asad_N, Mohsin etc told me to keep checking the level marked on the battery. The acid/water level isnt going down (even though the UPS has been running for over 2,3 months now, on average around 40 hours of loadshedding usage of battery per month).

Am i missing something? or the battery is supposed to last that long without maintenance? any ideas?


#7

^ Wait for summer :) With heat in environment and more cycle of recharging (due to more black-outs) that will heat-up battery to a level when water in cells start to boil (or get near boiling point) and steam out little by little.

By the way, don't open the valves to check water. They should be sealed tight to prevent evaporation.

I'll suggest you not to add acid, just fill in distilled water. In wet batteries, acid is added only once (at the start when battery is dry). After that if you add acid then you can compromise cells and it can shorten life of battery.


#8

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I need a battery for UPS and want to know that which one is best for long backup time should i go for dry battery plz help me
[/quote]

For UPS go for a deep cycle battery (wet or dry). Normal car batteries have thin plates and are designed to output max Amps during startup and then the current tapers off. Also car batteries should not be discharged below 90% full charge as they get damaged.

Deep cycle batteries have thicker plates so they give steady continuous current over a long duration. Deep cycle batteries can be safely discharged to 50% of full charge without damage.

In Pakistan Volta/Osaka make deep cycle wet batteries. They have designations starting with “IT”. For example their 140 Amp/hr battery is labeled IT-1000.

All other batteries (wet or dry) I have seen in Pakistan are normal car batteries and are not generally recommended for UPS.


#9

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

I’ll suggest you not to add acid, just fill in distilled water. In wet batteries, acid is added only once (at the start when battery is dry). After that if you add acid then you can compromise cells and it can shorten life of battery.

[/quote]

That’s not entirely accurate. If the pH value of the battery fluid goes down below certain level, adding more acid becomes necessary to maintain sufficient acidity required for battery to work. This is done using the big dropper thingy which has a floating marker. Doing it at home could be risky due to the fact that battery acid is a powerful acid.

The best way is to get your battery checked from the battery store every 3-4 months. They would set the mixture straight if needed by adding water or acid to maintain the required acidity.


#10

what would be the best way to buy a dry battery for a 750 watt UPS. I guess the charging time for a dry battery would be low as well ?


#11

OK distilled water should be used, I too agree but I have a question. I bought bottle for Rs.!5 which is said to be the distilled water. It was not sealed, so how can I come to know that the water I am buying is not the same tap water which I could also get in free at my home tap.


#12

If it's not sealed, then the contents are definitely doubtful. Distilled water bottles I've ever bought were sealed.

Some people (specially auto mechanics) strongly believe that tap water works fine in batteries. Well it does but it contains chemicals & minerals that eventually form a thin film over metal plates in the battery reducing the chemical reaction. Since this process is gradual, there is no apparent short term affect on the battery while in fact, this reduces battery life. It is like slow-poisoning the battery to death.

By the way, you CAN distill water at home. :-)


#13

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

That’s not entirely accurate. If the pH value of the battery fluid goes down below certain level, adding more acid becomes necessary to maintain sufficient acidity required for battery to work. This is done using the big dropper thingy which has a floating marker. Doing it at home could be risky due to the fact that battery acid is a powerful acid.

The best way is to get your battery checked from the battery store every 3-4 months. They would set the mixture straight if needed by adding water or acid to maintain the required acidity.

[/quote]

Lower pH level before normal life expectancy is a major problem of wet batteries. Adding acid will give a little jolt to battery’s life but it will worsen the case as it will shorten the life. That’s why I won’t recommend doing it.


#14

Those who have bought distilled water for topping off their batteries, can you tell me where you got it from and which brand did you buy? I checked with one battery seller and he showed me a small bottle from Excide Rs 20. and told me that this is the distilled water provided by the company for the batteries. He said Volta also sells them but he did not have Volta branded distilled water at the moment. The Excide bottle was not sealed, I asked him about it and he said that this is how the company sells it. Can anyone comment on this. Thanks


#15

Use Nestle or any mineral water


#16

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

Use Nestle or any mineral water
[/quote]

Mineral water has minerals in them. The whole point of distillation is to remove the minerals from the water. Otherwise the minerals leave a residue on the plates of the battery and in the long run severely compromise its performance.


#17

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

For UPS go for a deep cycle battery (wet or dry). Normal car batteries have thin plates and are designed to output max Amps during startup and then the current tapers off. Also car batteries should not be discharged below 90% full charge as they get damaged.

Deep cycle batteries have thicker plates so they give steady continuous current over a long duration. Deep cycle batteries can be safely discharged to 50% of full charge without damage.

In Pakistan Volta/Osaka make deep cycle wet batteries. They have designations starting with “IT”. For example their 140 Amp/hr battery is labeled IT-1000.

All other batteries (wet or dry) I have seen in Pakistan are normal car batteries and are not generally recommended for UPS.

[/quote]

All batteries are same … all plates are same.

How you know their plates are thick?


#18

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

All batteries are same … all plates are same.

How you know their plates are thick?

[/quote]

All batteries are not same. You need to do a little research on this topic. Try wikipedia for starters.

I know the plates are thick as the company says so. They have designed a new deep cycle battery with thicker plates. If you do not trust the company that is an other matter.


#19

In this season many vendors have labeled their batteries as "specialized for UPS" even some have named their series as UPS like Exide UPS 150.

Osaka IT 1000 has 17 plates which generates usually 100-110 amperes so their claim of 140 A is dubious.


#20

[quote=", post:, topic:"]

In this season many vendors have labeled their batteries as “specialized for UPS” even some have named their series as UPS like Exide UPS 150.

Osaka IT 1000 has 17 plates which generates usually 100-110 amperes so their claim of 140 A is dubious.

[/quote]

Yes, don’t go on labels. Most companies last summer labeled their ordinary car batteries as UPS 140 etc. They were all still car batteries. The companies did not claim that the batteries were deep cycle ones. This IT series from Volta was released last November and they said they designed it with thicker plates to withstand deep discharges and recharges. See here http://volta.com.pk/price.php

Generation of current does not depend only on the number of plates. The area of the plates, thickness of the plates, number of plates, the distance between the plates etc, all need to be taken into account.

Osaka IT-1000 is a 140 Amp/hr battery. I asked this from Volta main office. If you don’t trust the company, then how are you sure that the normal car battery that is rated by the company at a particular amp/hr, does indeed produce that amount of current?

It throws everything into doubt. You have to trust someone and the company told me that IT-1000 is 140 Amp/hr battery and I trust them.