AWG guage of 7/44 , 7/29 and 3/29 wires?


#1

Assalam o alaikum wa rehmat ULLAH .

Any one plz tell me the AWG or SWG of a common AC wire which is known 7/44 , 7/29 and 3/29

More over , if the guage is of ONLY one wire in 7 wires so how we will calculate the total AWG of entire 7 wires in 7/29 or 7/44 ?

jazak ALLAH


#2

To keep it simple, calculate and compare cross-sectional areas for nearest AWG rating.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_wire_gauge#Stranded_wire_AWG_sizes

For effective AWG, you can use this calculator: http://home.hiwaay.net/~rgs/awgcalculator.html

This document gives some common conversions: http://www.seas.gwu.edu/~ecelabs/appnotes/PDF/techdat/swc.pdf


#3

thats i am asking . that what is the AWG of 7 / 29 wire which is commonly available in our electrical shops (brand million 7/29) but i know that this is not guage 29 or guage 7 this is not AWG / SWG written . this is something different .

earlier i was thinking that this consists of 7 wires of guage 29 , but this is not the case in reality . As when we buy 7/44 that is THICKER than 7/29 instead of thinner . Because the lower the AWG the thicker the wire .

Thats y i m asking .


#4

It is usually interpreted as strand_count/gauge_per_strand.

Perhaps it is specified as strand count/cross-sectional area or else, strand count/strand diameter (imperial or metric)? Check strand diameter and tell if the latter is valid.


#5

[quote=“nadeem5476, post:, topic:”]

Assalam o alaikum wa rehmat ULLAH .

Any one plz tell me the AWG or SWG of a common AC wire which is known 7/44 , 7/29 and 3/29

More over , if the guage is of ONLY one wire in 7 wires so how we will calculate the total AWG of entire 7 wires in 7/29 or 7/44 ?

jazak ALLAH

[/quote]

7/44 = 7/0.044 = 7 strands of 0.044" diameter each ~= 6mm sq. Safe current handling(inside walls)(PVC Insulated), Single Phase 32 A.

7/29 = 7/0.029 = 7 strands of 0.029" diameter each ~= 2.5mm sq. Safe current handling(inside walls)(PVC Insulated), Single Phase 18.5 A.

3/29 = 3/0.029 = 3 strands of 0.029" diameter each ~= 1 mm. sq. Safe current handling(inside walls)(PVC Insulated), Single Phase 11 A.


#6

Here you go:

http://www.gvk.com.au/pdf/heatshrink/cable_sizes.pdf

http://www.generalcable.co.nz/getattachment/89f7a4be-fbec-498e-9982-81c26b7ba8e3/Imperial-Metric-Comparison.aspx


#7

If I am not mistaken, the Ampere ratings are for ambient of 25 degree Celsius.

For Pakistani environment and electrical practices, have an extra 50% capacity wire for your loads. For example if the load is of 20 amperes, better to have a wire that can handle 30 amperes in standard conditions.


#8

Thanks all for the reply , can i use 7/44 wire for DC current as well and the AMPS ratings will remain same as in 220 volts ?


#9

You should see typical manufacturer web site such as http://www.pakistancables.com/media/2595/gwc2014.pdf for detailed information which will give full specs including current capacity, voltage drop, temperature derating factors, etc. These specs are for low frequency (50/60 Hz) AC as wiring is generally purchased for such use.

If DC cables are used outdoors (e.g. for connecting solar panels and batteries/inverters in solar photovoltaic systems), their UV resistance and temperature rating must be higher than for cables only used indoors.

From quick internet search the following statements appear which seem reasonable:
" An amp of DC current through a cable will generate the same* heating as an amp of AC current through a cable.

(Actually slightly less. The resistance of a cable at DC is less than at AC. This is because there is no AC skin effect so the resistance is a few percent less.)

If you select a cable for DC current, using AC cable sizing guides / cable ampacities, your DC cable size will be conservative with respect to heating.

Note that various de-rating factors apply based on the installation environment of the cable. Proximity to other cables (which produce more heat), installation in a enclosed air space (which reduces air circulation i.e. cooling air), etc.

In Australia, the standard AS/NZS 3008 “Selection of Cables” covers all these de-rating factors in great detail."